How many watts do you actually need?

Small guide to power requirements

How many watts does your system actually need?

 

Introduction

A lot of the time over on the forums, we see people list their systems with far larger power supplies than they'll ever actually need. The majority of single graphics card systems we see will rarely ever even require over 400 watts of power, despite a lot of graphics card manufacturers claiming you need more. Even an Intel 4670k with an Nvidia 780 Ti will run perfectly fine on a decent quality 450 watt power supply.

Today, we're showing you just how much power a decent high end system will consume, which may just put your mind at ease when planning your next build.

 

Specifications

  • Intel 4670K
  • Asus Maximus VI Gene
    Asus ROG Front Base
  • Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB 2400MHz
  • Corsair H100i
  • Asus GTX 780 Ti DirectCU II
  • 240GB Corsair Neutron SSD
  • 1TB Western Digital Green
  • Corsair RM450

 

Conclusion

As we can see in the video our system runs completely normally even on a small power supply such as the Corsair RM450. Of course, we'd always recommend a high quality unit regardless of which system you were running, and the price differences between a high quality 450w unit and a low quality 750w+ unit is pretty negligible. With a lot of people under the delusion that they need to spend so much extra money on a larger power supply, with the money they could save, they could put that towards upgrading other parts of the system. This could actually end up meaning a choice between a GTX 770 with a high wattage power supply, or getting by with a lower watt unit and being able to afford a GTX 780 Ti or an R9 290X.

A lot of the high quality power supplies these days have a silent operation mode when the system is requiring less than 20% of its maximum output. This is actually a reason why some people, even when they know their system won't draw much power, still opt for a higher wattage power supply in order to benefit from the silent fan operation. However, as we can see in the video, during idle periods, our system only requires around 90w of power which is still well within the limits of the idle fan mode of the RM450.

Now, once we've gone into more intensive programs such as a game, our system still only pulls between 350w and 400w, so it still has a fair amount of headroom before fully maxing out our RM450. Of course, there are many other decent power units you can choose, and some of the lower wattage units are completely fan-less too. As long as the PSU you're using is from a quality brand such as Corsair, you shouldn't have any problems.

When we stressed the processor on its own, we only saw our system pulling around 175w from the wall. This shows that even if you're using your system for mainly CPU intensive tasks such as photoshop or rendering, the PSU isn't going to be struggling much at all.

We have also tested various other systems for maximum power consumption. One of our rigs with a 3960X overclocked to 4.6GHz, with an AMD 280X only pulled a maximum of 434w from the wall, and numerous other lower end systems which only pulled around the 200-300w mark.

Recently, hardware has been getting more and more power efficient and so in the future, we expect results such as this to be possible on even lower wattage power supplies. Having said that, obviously if you plan on upgrading to an SLI or Crossfire set up in the future, it's pointless buying a 450w power supply and then changing it a couple of months later. This does prove itself as a very good demonstration of just how much power your system is likely to need. You may want to go for something slightly bigger in order to get a little more headroom so your power supply isn't running close to full capacity all the time, but this still may make you wonder just how much your own system requires.

So our final thought is if it means spending the same amount of money on a higher quality lower wattage unit then do it. Don't fall in to the trap of thinking a £60 800w power supply is going to be better for your rig than a £60 high quality 450 watter.

We'd love to hear your thoughts and opinions over on the OC3D Forums.

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Most Recent Comments

26-02-2014, 07:13:03

tinytomlogan
http://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/artic...065152947l.jpg

Since many people buy PSUs way bigger than they'll ever need, we show you just how many watts systems actually require.


Continue ReadingQuote

26-02-2014, 07:24:23

Remmy
Is there supposed to be a link here Tom?Quote

26-02-2014, 07:26:45

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remmy View Post
Is there supposed to be a link here Tom?
He only places the link after the article or review is on the main site, no point linking to nothing.

I'm surprised you haven't noticed this before.Quote

26-02-2014, 07:27:57

Remmy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Watsyerproblem View Post
He only places the link after the article or review is on the main site, no point linking to nothing.

I'm surprised you haven't noticed this before.
Oh right I see, I assumed the post would have been made afterwards, my bad. I've never seen it happen before so I guess I'm never on it quick enough to see Quote

26-02-2014, 07:28:15

barnsley
Most people buy bigger power supplies under the belief they'll upgrade later on then never actually do. Its what I've done as I want to get another 280x. Will I actually ever get another one? I dunno. I kinda went overboard for the psu regardless as the system would probably pull about 525w from estimations I've seen.Quote

26-02-2014, 07:34:45

Remmy
Anyway, eye-opening video and educational video, but some people just like overkill anyway I guess Quote

26-02-2014, 07:38:41

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remmy View Post
Oh right I see, I assumed the post would have been made afterwards, my bad. I've never seen it happen before so I guess I'm never on it quick enough to see
Need a forum thread before I can put the review live fella.....Quote

26-02-2014, 07:43:46

ShaunB-91
O.o AX860 is hibernating, or at least half of it.

Edit: Off topic but your taking care of your desks Tom, isn't there some sort of wrap or something that you can stick on to protect them, just like a clear plastic?Quote

26-02-2014, 07:50:28

WYP
Great video and write up there, buying a good quality unit should always be the top priority for any build.

The power draw for components are getting pretty darn low, just look at the 750Ti pulling a stupidly low 60w of power, amazing work there Nvidia!

That being said I have helped people who have had oversized PSUs burn on them and it isn't pretty, good thing OCZ don't make PSUs anymore.

I currently run a CM 1000w PSU for a setup that simply does not need it, but it got me away from my old OCZ PSU so I'm happy.Quote

26-02-2014, 07:59:35

Messy_Blob
I went for a 750 RM PSU, which was a much higher wattage than I strictly needed, because the power rating only really applies when new. Over say 5-8 years (my typical upgrade cycle) the capacitors degrade, and cannot deliver their rated power. If I can find the technical article that states a 45% degradation to the power delivery over 5 years, I'll come back and edit this post.
Also, I was given a GTX-570, which is far less efficient than say an equivalently-performing 660Ti, slightly better 760, or future 850. I have my power supply top-mounted (in a 2006 NXT MIDI tower), so it takes in the air heated by the 570. Having the thermal headroom in the PSU avoids operating difficulties.Quote

26-02-2014, 08:01:29

Squidlorock
I shall check out the vid later on Tom You know, from looking at builds with overclocking/amd's 125w etc... i was always quite confused on power usage etc... as long as it's not like an icute psu or something Quote

26-02-2014, 08:04:40

Remmy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Messy_Blob View Post
I went for a 750 HX PSU, which was a much higher wattage than I strictly needed, because the power rating only really applies when new. Over say 5-8 years (my typical upgrade cycle) the capacitors degrade, and cannot deliver their rated power. If I can find the technical article that states a 45% degradation to the power delivery over 5 years, I'll come back and edit this post.
Also, I was given a GTX-570, which is far less efficient than say an equivalently-performing 660Ti, slightly better 760, or future 850. I have my power supply top-mounted (in a 2006 NXT MIDI tower), so it takes in the air heated by the 570. Having the thermal headroom in the PSU avoids operating difficulties.
That would be a really interesting read, thanks. I'd have thought that the capacitors degrading would have just increased the amount of ripple on the outputs, so I'll have to read it and educate myself Quote

26-02-2014, 08:30:13

MadShadow
That was really helpful as usual. I always wondered how many watts I could get away with Quote

26-02-2014, 08:39:11

Messy_Blob
Quote:
Originally Posted by Messy_Blob View Post
...Over say 5-8 years (my typical upgrade cycle) the capacitors degrade, and cannot deliver their rated power. If I can find the technical article that states a 45% degradation to the power delivery over 5 years, I'll come back and edit this post.
The actual degradation is difficult to quantify. Web searches yield inconsistent results.
Some 'estimator' tools put it as high as 10% per year, with conservative estimates around 2%. Degradation seems to happen most with poor capacitors, poor product design, high operating temperatures, and constant use near their designed maximum capacity.
Actual effects are difficult to quantify too: most sources note that the quality of the delivered power is poor, others say that the power is delivered but less efficiently (drawing more current from the wall), and only a few say that the power delivery limits are lowered.
I'd say that this is a subject that is in need of debunking, particularly as the web is populated by articles where the authors have an interest in selling higher-powered PSUs. It will lead to better-informed risk management when people buy their PSUs, an objective shared by the OC article.Quote

26-02-2014, 08:47:34

Wraith
Great and very informative information right here! Kudos! Will watch the vid later as usual with my tea.

Could also hit on the PCIe connector wattage I get asked loads how much power my GPU needs which is dead simple to work out.

a single 6pin = 75w MAX
a single 8pin = 150 MAX

Although with the arrival of Maxwell this throws it in the air as they are seriously efficient, but it's a base standard I've always used to estimate power needs obviously also taking into account the motherboard max TDP and CPU wattage.Quote

26-02-2014, 08:52:18

Germo
Shame on me but i'm still using my 7-8 year old 450 watt Codegen(!) PSU Quote

26-02-2014, 09:05:40

rmaero
Bear in mind that these are high quality-components PSU's, which will degrade less over time.
I have a 650w nzxt (hale82, modular) on a 3770k, 8gb dominator platinum, a MSI 660 oc, with 2 hdd's and an ssd. Yes, it's larger than I'll ever need but it's fine, it wasn't that much expensive and it has good quality being built by seasonic (corsair, or other 'better' brands are a rare commodity where I live). I have thought about power consumption and this unit seemed reasonable, although I didn't accounted for the noise, the fan is just horridly loud - which I have changed with a lower-rpm, better bearing one.
I like to give the psu a little more headroom and don't let it get so close to its maximum load for a few reasons: one is taken into account on the video which is noise. Another point would be efficiency, most power supplies are more efficient when they're at 50% load (but there's not much difference between 90% and 92% efficiency) although you probably end up idling your system most of the time unless you only use it for gaming/rendering/smth else that uses a lot of computing power. Also keep in mind that the closer to the threshold the hotter the psu, thus reducing life span. This may not matter much for many users as they might update their system way before any component dies. Not entirely my case though...
Maybe some other point I can't remember as I'm writing.
I had to build a system for my sister a few months back and went with the lowest wattage, 'good quality' I could get so to keep it on a budget and that psu even supports a 7850 or maybe even 7950 I've read and since for now she's using the i5's igfx it has a lot of headroom :-)

As a side note: I have almost the exact kb-mouse combo as in the video (my mouse is a kinzu v2, not sure the one on the vid is the same) it's quite difficult to see that combination, so it caught my attentionQuote

26-02-2014, 10:33:07

Conchubair
Went into the video thinking 550/575W and was pleasently suprised to see a 450 doing the job..

Will definitely put future PSU purchases into perspective.Quote

26-02-2014, 10:43:05

Kaapstad
Some of the latest AMD cards like the 290X can pull serious amounts of watts, my system overclocked and running Firestrike Extreme pulled 1778 watts at the wall when I measured it.Quote

26-02-2014, 11:33:06

!!!behappyz!!!
This is good news for friends and family members who are still on the fence for switching over to PC gaming from console gaming. They can save few ($$) on total cost of their possible rigs. Very good video and writeup, Tom.Quote

26-02-2014, 11:37:28

iBeInspire
did Corsair stop making the TX550m that I've got?

Seemed like the perfect price for any single-gpu setup at the time I bought it... seems I was right :PQuote

26-02-2014, 12:01:57

ander01se
Interesting post, thanks TTL. Quote

26-02-2014, 14:05:02

remember300
i have lent my watt measurer to a friend but how would you rate to onboard voltage regulators? like with the corsair link software. i get around 340 watts draw with a usage around 310-320 being used according to the software.Quote

26-02-2014, 14:23:51

Remmy
Quote:
Originally Posted by remember300 View Post
i have lent my watt measurer to a friend but how would you rate to onboard voltage regulators? like with the corsair link software. i get around 340 watts draw with a usage around 310-320 being used according to the software.
Yeah the system is obviously going to use a bit less than what is being pulled from the wall due to inefficiencies in the PSU, but it'd be difficult to know exactly how much. I suppose you could calculate it from the efficiency at a given load, if you can find the graphs for your PSU.Quote

26-02-2014, 14:30:35

remember300
Yeah, psu's are norm more efficient at 230-240V that at the American and some EU equivalent's lucky us .
I would of also mentioned things about the ratings of efficiencies of psu's, I think mine is platinum rated and i get while gaming around 92-96% efficiency so im paying less for heat loss etc... so when buying a psu or recommending one i also try and look at the curves, to try and get the best efficiency for the power they will use and i normally come up with about 500W and 600W for most systems using a single gpu even some multi-card options, well with the Cx range by corsair cos i really, really don't rate cheap PSU's
I was just wondering while tom had his Watt reader if he had a linked PSU to test other wise ill have to wait till next week lol.Quote

26-02-2014, 14:42:12

CrazyTeeka
Now I have to check how many watts my rig uses.Quote

26-02-2014, 19:59:06

Bartacus
Great video! About damn time someone addressed this and hopefully enlightened some people.Quote

26-02-2014, 23:14:47

jesse525
Interesting topic, I'm surprised no one has done something like this before.

When ever i had to buy PSU i've looked at all my components to see which one has the high power needs. i go for the one with the highest efficient rating and lowest watts i can get a way with. With that said maybe i don't need to go that route anymore.Quote

27-02-2014, 00:05:45

KING_OF_SAND
In actuality a bigger PSU than you need would be the safest bet. Use more than you need means the PSU will never need to work as hard, thus creating less heat, and less strain on the PSU. The question is more when do you experience the law of diminishing return which varies depending on the PSU manufacturer.Quote

27-02-2014, 00:31:15

Xploited Titan
Currently using a 650W power supply (Antec Signature), and in full load (gaming) I am more or less in the sweet spot of the efficiency curve with around 500 Watts taken from the wall socket.

Like others say, it is always nice to have some headroom to compensate for the psu's aging.Quote

27-02-2014, 01:00:53

Excalabur50
Very interesting video and postQuote

27-02-2014, 05:36:57

iNoXiouZ
I'm quite amazed at how little power even seemingly high end PC's use, I did a quick benchmark run with Metro LL maxed out (apart from PhsyX).

3930K @ 4.5Ghz
2 x HD7950's Factory overclocked
16GB of RAM
Asrock Extreme 9 X79
Creative X-fi sound card
2 SSD's
5 x GT AP29's with FC5 V3 Controller
D5 Pump
Seasonic platinum 860W
ETC.....

With all this I was expecting to see 600-650W but the highest reading I saw was 451W

Granted, the metro LL benchmark isn't a worst case scenario but it still surprised me.

P.S I'm using the same watt meter Tom used in his video.Quote

27-02-2014, 06:04:33

Kong
Now Tom, how am I going to talk my wife into the 1500i when it's released after she was sitting beside me on her laptop and hears videos like this tsk tsk lol.Quote

27-02-2014, 06:12:12

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kong View Post
Now Tom, how am I going to talk my wife into the 1500i when it's released after she was sitting beside me on her laptop and hears videos like this tsk tsk lol.

If its for the rig in your sig then shes doing you a favor matey Quote

27-02-2014, 08:04:11

Squidlorock
Managed to watch it last night, was a great insight into the power consumption with a high quality low wattage psu! I was going to try to get a 600w for my soon to be built rig, though with this video&peoples opinions i've heard i'll be going for a 500/550w. As always great video man Quote

27-02-2014, 08:55:03

Stoner81
Awesome video Tom very informative! I do feel that you rushed it a little which I know was kind of the point since you wanted to try and keep it short but to me it just had that rushed feeling to it rather than the laid back chilled out atmosphere I have come to love and expect from your videos

Stoner81.Quote

27-02-2014, 15:37:11

Kong
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinytomlogan View Post
If its for the rig in your sig then shes doing you a favor matey
http://cdn.visualnews.com/wp-content...nd-Ammo-15.jpgQuote

02-03-2014, 01:01:39

anonymous
This video was very informative. Although I already focus on getting good quality PSUs for my computers, I will now pay attention to the wattage as well. It's amazing how energy efficient components are nowadays.Quote

02-03-2014, 03:28:54

Milky
Great video Tom, i will be using this advice in my current build which will now be using a Corsair 650RM instead of and 850! Cheers! (Yes before you ask i was always the overkill PSU guy haha)Quote

03-03-2014, 10:30:20

zherial
I always thought that for a high end gaming pc with a single gpu you will be needing a 550W-600W for it, it's amazing that a mere 450 watt but a very good psu can handle it even on high loadQuote

03-03-2014, 10:31:44

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by zherial View Post
I always thought that for a high end gaming pc with a single gpu you will be needing a 550W-600W for it, it's amazing that a mere 450 watt but a very good psu can handle it even on high load
I said in the video a 450 works but if I bought a PSU for that system Id probably buy the RM 550/650Quote

03-03-2014, 19:53:24

zherial
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinytomlogan View Post
I said in the video a 450 works but if I bought a PSU for that system Id probably buy the RM 550/650
oh i see, by the way, great video man Quote

04-03-2014, 09:50:16

geo2160
Hey Tom, you should've also mentioned the efficiency curve. The RM-450, being a gold rated PSU, should be at ~90% efficiency during the OCCT/unigine benchmarks. So if it pulls 430W from the wall, the components themselves only pull ~390W, which is even less(!) than what you mentioned. The PSU wasn't even that worked up and that's why the fan barely started spinning. I think that even with PSU degradation taken into consideration (another myth which needs to be clarified), a 450W PSU should be enough for such a rig.Quote

04-03-2014, 09:59:06

remember300
i mentioned efficiencies earlier, and tbh if you look at that curve your probs looking at 94% at most and thats around the mid level draw of 225VQuote

06-03-2014, 15:01:11

davev8
Yes i was going to say but you beet me to it ,is that the psu OUTPUT is 450 watts but it was INPUT watts thats was measured, so tom had another 40 watts to play with as its 92% efficient the input will be 8 watts per 100w more than what the rig uses from the psu
i use this calculator http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine
i fill in the spec of toms rig and it cam up with min psu 434 watts recommended 484 watts
so its nice for me to know that this calculator tallies with toms real world findingsQuote

06-03-2014, 15:38:33

NeverBackDown
Keep in mind max efficiency for any PSU is at 50% load. So you will not get the max efficiency at full load.Quote

07-03-2014, 03:36:55

davev8
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Keep in mind max efficiency for any PSU is at 50% load. So you will not get the max efficiency at full load.
yes you are correct...i see this psu has a pretty flat efficiency curve with only 2 watts variation across the board

I think tom should do a follow up vid showing the difference in 12v output of a cheap psu and a good one
EG i have a trust 420 watt psu that has 16 amps on the 12v rail
and a Sevanteam 400watt that has 30amp total (16 amp X2)
and a 350 watt hiper that has 22amp
The Trust is Sh1te but its its a lower mid priced psu at £30 not a bargain basement at £15
especially when you can buy a
Corsair Builder Series CX430 V2 with a 28 amp 12v rail for £2 moreQuote

07-03-2014, 04:56:06

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Keep in mind max efficiency for any PSU is at 50% load. So you will not get the max efficiency at full load.
1% difference at best so stop talking out of your arse. Eff % at 100% is still tested for the 80%+ rating.Quote

17-03-2014, 16:09:41

daveygamer
i have i5 3570k
2x 7870 hawks
2 sata drives
1 ssd
1blu-ray drive
6 leg 120 fans
ga-z77-ud5h

at the moment i use an old ocz 1000watt psu but time to get a new psu what size psu would you think i would needQuote

17-03-2014, 16:09:43

Scoob
I did a bit of research into this myself a while back, indeed I think I posted a topic on these very forums.

Anyway, picked up another power meter wall plug thingy the other day and did some tests. My system, when pushed in either gaming or the Heaven benchmark, pulls around 530w in total, not too bad considering it's an overclocked 2500k (so not as power efficient as the newer Ivy B. etc.) with a pair of GTX 680's - 2500k is @ 4.6 currently and the 680's are at 1200/7000.

The BIG thing, well at least for me, is this is power draw from the wall for the entire system - i.e. monitor etc. as well - so there are other things plugged in to the socket being measured too, here's a list:

- The PC components above plus 3x 120mm fans.
- 24" Monitor
- Illuminated Keyboard
- Speakers with Sub
- External Pump for Water cooling
- 4x 180mm fans on external rad
- My laptop dock with a laptop charging in it (always on, fiddly to unplug the dock lol)

So, that's a few items for that 530w. Interestingly, my 860i PSU apparently only spins up its fans when it hits a 400w+ load - I only rarely hear the fans spin up. My PSU is Platinum rated apparently and, using the monitoring software that came with it, it usually reports around 99% efficiency under these sort of loads, not a huge deal of course, but quite satisfying to see.

Anyway, just thought people would like another comparison to confirm that a dedicated gaming rig, even one running a pair of GPU's, doesn't need a 1200w PSU. My friend was actually running TWO PSU's in his old rig, one for the "system" and one just for the GPU's, for 2200w of PSU power all in. I did point out it was somewhat overkill, but he wasn't having it...until I replumbed it for him using just the "small" 1000w PSU and it was much more stable...

Cheers,

Scoob.Quote

17-03-2014, 16:12:11

daveygamer
i have i5 3570k
2x 7870 hawks
2 sata drives
1 ssd
1blu-ray drive
6 leg 120 fans
ga-z77-ud5h

at the moment i use an old ocz 1000watt psu but time to get a new psu what size psu would you think i would needQuote

17-03-2014, 16:16:46

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveygamer View Post
i have i5 3570k
2x 7870 hawks
2 sata drives
1 ssd
1blu-ray drive
6 leg 120 fans
ga-z77-ud5h

at the moment i use an old ocz 1000watt psu but time to get a new psu what size psu would you think i would need
budget might help but an RM650/750 would be fineQuote

17-03-2014, 16:26:57

Scoob
Quote:
Originally Posted by daveygamer View Post
i have i5 3570k
2x 7870 hawks
2 sata drives
1 ssd
1blu-ray drive
6 leg 120 fans
ga-z77-ud5h

at the moment i use an old ocz 1000watt psu but time to get a new psu what size psu would you think i would need
May I ask why you feel it's time to get a new PSU if the existing one is doing the job? I replaced my old Corsair 750w with the new 860i only because I though the old unit had a problem, turned out to be something else entirely... oops lol.

Possibly I'm wrong, but I'd have thought you OCZ, being a good brand, would remain a good unit for years to come. With modern hardware typically using less and less power, I can't see myself needing a PSU larger than my 860i unless some standard change to power connectors occurs.

Just interested in your thinking on this, though of course I totally get it if you just fancy buying new stuff lol.

Scoob.Quote

17-03-2014, 17:40:54

Vicey
I know for a fact my system doesn't pull anywhere near 1200 Watts. I'd guess that with my overclocking and the components I'm using I'm about 600 Watts from the wall socket with everything loaded to 100%.

But I purchased the AX1200 PSU that I use because it had a 7 year warranty, ran silently at my load level and enough capacity that it gave me the option in the future to use more power hungry parts. I was considering going Dual XEON's with the Z9 board before the E5 reviews showed that the XEON chips couldn't overclock. I was also considering Tri-SLI at one time although I didn't go that way eventually.

So for me I have 1200 Watts and 7 year warranty. I'm pretty much not going to buy a new PSU for the next 5 years (at the end of which my warranty ends). If this PSU fails any time within the next 5 I'll just RMA it and I know I over purchased enough capacity for any future build I intend to make.Quote

17-03-2014, 19:55:15

Kaapstad
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinytomlogan View Post
1% difference at best so stop talking out of your arse. Eff % at 100% is still tested for the 80%+ rating.
You can get quite a difference in efficiency on a PSU depending on load.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/80_PlusQuote

14-12-2014, 12:40:41

makhuyatz
hi there! i have 530 watt psu ( http://www.thermaltake.com/products-...?id=C_00001964 ). is this enough for my build? im a new pc builder and this is my first to build one. just a low end pc i guess. i'm just a moderate pc user/gamer mainly dota 2.

-intel g3258 (plan to oc, just to experience or any benefits i can get)
-msi h81m p33
-1tb sata wd sata blue
-8 gb ram ripjaws x
-palit gt730 gddr5 64 bit
-xigmatek dark knight night hawk cpu cooler
-6 xigmatek 120mm fans
-nzxt sentry mix 2 fan controller (acc)
-nzxt rgb hue led controller (acc)

i plan on upgrading my build in the near future. any feedback is much appreciated. thanks!Quote

14-12-2014, 12:47:30

Thelosouvlakia
It will handle it EASILY you system won't draw more than 200Watts under load!
And the PSU is futureproof enough. You could add a GTX 750ti and there you've got an awesome budget performer Quote

14-12-2014, 12:49:40

barnsley
Quote:
Originally Posted by makhuyatz View Post
hi there! i have 530 watt psu ( http://www.thermaltake.com/products-...?id=C_00001964 ). is this enough for my build? im a new pc builder and this is my first to build one. just a low end pc i guess. i'm just a moderate pc user/gamer mainly dota 2.

-intel g3258 (plan to oc, just to experience or any benefits i can get)
-msi h81m p33
-1tb sata wd sata blue
-8 gb ram ripjaws x
-palit gt730 gddr5 64 bit
-xigmatek dark knight night hawk cpu cooler
-6 xigmatek 120mm fans
-nzxt sentry mix 2 fan controller (acc)
-nzxt rgb hue led controller (acc)

i plan on upgrading my build in the near future. any feedback is much appreciated. thanks!
Its not an ideal brand but if thats the only psu you can get it'll be ok. You should get rid of three of those fans, the fan controller and led controller so you can atleast get an ssd/a graphics card that'll play games.Quote

14-12-2014, 13:46:15

makhuyatz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thelosouvlakia View Post
It will handle it EASILY you system won't draw more than 200Watts under load!
And the PSU is futureproof enough. You could add a GTX 750ti and there you've got an awesome budget performer
thank you very much for the fast reply. and yes i'm considering the gtx 750ti for an upgrade. . but for now, i'll stick with the gt 730 as i plan on ocing the cpu. and i read that ocing might damage any components when done wrong, and i'm afraid this might happen to me. just to be safe.

--------------

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnsley View Post
Its not an ideal brand but if thats the only psu you can get it'll be ok. You should get rid of three of those fans, the fan controller and led controller so you can atleast get an ssd/a graphics card that'll play games.
i already got the psu so i'm gonna stick to it. i'll consider your suggestion on removing those acc. and getting a more powerful graphics card.
but my knowledge on ocing is not that good and it's holding me back as i might damage a component (e.g. graphics card) so i'll be putting a less powerful gpu just to be safe.

thank you and thank you for the suggestion... Quote

14-12-2014, 14:02:44

Feronix
Quote:
Originally Posted by makhuyatz View Post
thank you very much for the fast reply. and yes i'm considering the gtx 750ti for an upgrade. . but for now, i'll stick with the gt 730 as i plan on ocing the cpu. and i read that ocing might damage any components when done wrong, and i'm afraid this might happen to me. just to be safe.
The only thing that you can break when OCing your CPU is... your CPU. Potentially your motherboard if you get a really one. Also, I'm fairly certain you cannot overclock on the H81 chipset?

I'd follow Barnsley's advice and save up for the GTX 750 Ti. You could even use the stock CPU cooler for now to save even more money and as said you really don't need 6 fans for this set-up, nor a fan controller.

Lastly, I get that fancy lighting in your case is cool and all, but these really aren't things you should be spending money on with your budget. Get the core components now (mobo, CPU, GPU, HDD, case, PSU, RAM), then start saving up for extras such as an aftermarket CPU cooler, fans or lighting.Quote

14-12-2014, 14:19:06

Thelosouvlakia
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feronix View Post
The only thing that you can break when OCing your CPU is... your CPU. Potentially your motherboard if you get a really one. Also, I'm fairly certain you cannot overclock on the H81 chipset?
Because the CPU is a joke in terms of power consumption some manufacturers have brought out BIOS updates for their lower end 1150 chipset motherboards that will allow ONLY multiplier overclocking.Quote

14-12-2014, 16:45:52

makhuyatz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feronix View Post
The only thing that you can break when OCing your CPU is... your CPU. Potentially your motherboard if you get a really one. Also, I'm fairly certain you cannot overclock on the H81 chipset?

I'd follow Barnsley's advice and save up for the GTX 750 Ti. You could even use the stock CPU cooler for now to save even more money and as said you really don't need 6 fans for this set-up, nor a fan controller.

Lastly, I get that fancy lighting in your case is cool and all, but these really aren't things you should be spending money on with your budget. Get the core components now (mobo, CPU, GPU, HDD, case, PSU, RAM), then start saving up for extras such as an aftermarket CPU cooler, fans or lighting.

Sad to say but i'm really 'noob' on building a pc. im just trying to learn these things by reading forums about ocing, etc. and that's where i read where some components (connected on the mobo) would also break if the mobo had died on failed ocing.
i think i'll just take my time and gain more knowledge about these things before investing on mid to high end pc components. thanks for the insight though

sorry for my bad english.Quote

08-04-2016, 20:13:21

Dartanion74
Hello!
I am new here and just watched the video today about Power Supply requirements - So without further adieu - here are the specs:

Operating System
Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
CPU
AMD FX-8320 16 °C
Vishera 32nm Technology

RAM
16.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 669MHz (9-9-9-24)
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co. Ltd. 970A-DS3P (CPU 1) 37 °C
Graphics
ASUS VW266H (1920x1200@59Hz) Monitor LEFT
SyncMaster (1920x1080@60Hz) Monitor RIGHT
3071MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 (EVGA) 68 °C
Storage
1863GB Western Digital WDC WD20EFRX-68EUZN0 ATA Device (SATA) 31 °C
465GB Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500GB ATA Device (SSD) 35 °C
223GB KINGSTON SV300S37A240G ATA Device (SSD) 32 °C
931GB Western Digital WDC WD10EALX-009BA0 ATA Device (SATA) 35 °C
Optical Drives
ATAPI DVD A DH24ABS ATA Device
Cooler
Corsair H60 120mm Radiator for the CPU
Power Supply Currently: OCZ 80 Rated 700 Watt Model OCZ700MXSP


I would like to upgrade to the EVGA Nvidia 780 GTX 3GB FTW card (runs for about $245.00 US on Amazon.com) Will my Rig handle the card based on the current specs? I am thinking it would with overhead to spare but I wanted an honest opinion. Thank you all - love the site and forums here!

Regards
Dartanion74
Orlando, FL USAQuote

09-04-2016, 06:44:18

Tolemac
OCZ = Get rid quickly Quote

09-04-2016, 08:22:20

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dartanion74 View Post
Hello!
I am new here and just watched the video today about Power Supply requirements - So without further adieu - here are the specs:

Operating System
Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
CPU
AMD FX-8320 16 °C
Vishera 32nm Technology

RAM
16.0GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 669MHz (9-9-9-24)
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co. Ltd. 970A-DS3P (CPU 1) 37 °C
Graphics
ASUS VW266H (1920x1200@59Hz) Monitor LEFT
SyncMaster (1920x1080@60Hz) Monitor RIGHT
3071MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 (EVGA) 68 °C
Storage
1863GB Western Digital WDC WD20EFRX-68EUZN0 ATA Device (SATA) 31 °C
465GB Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500GB ATA Device (SSD) 35 °C
223GB KINGSTON SV300S37A240G ATA Device (SSD) 32 °C
931GB Western Digital WDC WD10EALX-009BA0 ATA Device (SATA) 35 °C
Optical Drives
ATAPI DVD A DH24ABS ATA Device
Cooler
Corsair H60 120mm Radiator for the CPU
Power Supply Currently: OCZ 80 Rated 700 Watt Model OCZ700MXSP


I would like to upgrade to the EVGA Nvidia 780 GTX 3GB FTW card (runs for about $245.00 US on Amazon.com) Will my Rig handle the card based on the current specs? I am thinking it would with overhead to spare but I wanted an honest opinion. Thank you all - love the site and forums here!

Regards
Dartanion74
Orlando, FL USA

On paper it will all run fine, but there is a general consensus here that OCZ power supplies are not really that good. They have not been made for a long time either so I would put it on the upgrade list when you can Quote

09-04-2016, 08:40:53

JR23
For SLI 780's at stock, especially with a not particularly efficient CPU then I would look at 850W power supplies and for heavy overclocks even higher. 700W would probably work for sure but it's very close to it's limits and from what i've heard about OCZ any power at all is close to their limit. But I have no experience with them, it's not something I would ever attempt to combine with nice hardware like SLI 780's. Amazing that they are still available in off the shelf in the US actually.

JRQuote
Reply
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