Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

Packaging and Contents

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

Packaging and Contents

The Seidon 120M is presented in a predominantly black box but does of course sport the well known Cooler Master Purple panels.  The rear of the box gives the usual specs and features with the front being given over in the main to a nice arty shot of the cold plate with the rad in the back ground.  

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

Opening the box we find that Cooler Master like many other manufacturers are moving away from vast chunks of polystyrene in favour of more Eco friendly reconstituted cardboard.  The layout is similar to that of the Corsair H60, however Cooler Master have allowed much more room between the various contents and as such the box is bigger and a lot less cramped.  Each of the items comes sealed into its own zip lock plastic bag, and each sits in its own compartment.  Cooler Master provide fittings for pretty much all current CPUs from both Intel and AMD, with socket 2011 fittings being included in their own little bag to avoid any confusion.  A small syringe of Cooler Master TIM is also included in the box, although as always we shall be using our Noctua TIM.

  Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

The instructions for the Seidon 120M are similar to those included with other Cooler Master products and it has to be said aren't as clear as those we see with other manufacturers.  A small strip of images down the left side of the sheet which folds out to the size of a small duvet cover are accompanied by columns of written instructions in just about every language you can think of (excluding Welsh).  Those with aging or tired eyes will find them selves having to squint quite hard to see what's going on in the pictures.

  Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review  

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Most Recent Comments

03-04-2013, 09:51:58

Master&Puppet
Looks like a reasonable alternative to some of the mid-range tower coolers on cooler systems although it seems pretty noisy.Quote

03-04-2013, 09:53:19

barnsley
I was hoping you'd review this! I've been looking at AIO coolers for my new build for sometime and I wondered about this. Definitely going on my parts to buy list Quote

03-04-2013, 10:06:56

UkGouki
its a pretty good choice if you only wont a moderate overclock tbh im thinking of getting this as funds at the mo are tight and it will get me what i want out of my system Quote

03-04-2013, 12:29:02

lwatcdr
I just do not get it. Why does everyone just use fan controllers and such when modern Motherboards have fan headers and heat sensors. Why can't people set a max CPU temp of say 60c and let the computer spin the fan up and down as the load changes? You could then alway have the lowest noise for a given temp. Seems like this should be an automated function.Quote

03-04-2013, 14:20:06

alpenwasser
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwatcdr View Post
I just do not get it. Why does everyone just use fan controllers and such when modern Motherboards have fan headers and heat sensors. Why can't people set a max CPU temp of say 60c and let the computer spin the fan up and down as the load changes? You could then alway have the lowest noise for a given temp. Seems like this should be an automated function.
I can only speak for myself but I have yet to possess a motherboard that
  • has enough fan headers for my needs in the right locations and/or
  • provides enough power on its fan headers to power an array of fans,
  • provides enough power for a D5 pump (I know they can be hooked up to the PSU directly and the Vario can be adjusted without a fan controller, but it's much more comfortable not having to use the little nob on the pump's back, and yes, I do change my pump's speed from time to time, albeit not often) and
  • lets me define not only max temps but actual fan curves, because everything else is useless (to me, at least).

These are unlikely to change in the future. It's not really reasonable to build a M/B with 10 to 12 fan headers (which you can easily use with two radiators on push/pull or something comparable) or fan headers that can provide ~30 W of power for a pump (market is too small).

The fan curve thing should be feasible though, I'll admit. I don't want my fans spinning up to 100% when a certain max temp is hit, I want them to ramp up by maybe 20% to see if that's enough and then throttle down again.

If you look at a real fan controller like the Aquaero, that's a very complex tool. You don't just integrate something like that into a M/B. It is certainly feasible, but it would cost accordingly.

Overall I'd say cost is probably the reason why the M/B that fits my needs regarding fan control is unlikely to arrive any time soon, and as long as that I'll stick to fan controllers. Besides, I like fan controllers, they have knobs and buttons and displays and stuff Quote
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