Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

Up Close: Cold plate and Radiator

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

Up Close:  Cold plate and Radiator

The Aluminium Radiator of the Seidon measures 150.3x118x27mm so is just a fraction thicker than your average 25mm case fan and strangely a little narrower across at only 118mm.  The two end tanks, with the tubing attachment end being a little bigger than the other give the radiator an overall length of 150.3mm, 35mm greater than that of a case fan.  Aside from being extremely interesting, these measurements are critical to you if you are planning to put the rad directly inside the rear extract position with the fan internal to the radiator acting as a pushing extract.  If that's the way you mount the set up, and it's the way we mount them, then make sure you have sufficient room at the rear of your case to do so.  The tubing is connected to the rad on one side of the larger end tanks either side of the centre line.  What we assume to be the manufacturers fill port lies to the far end with a tempting sticker urging us not to tamper with or remove it, although it does appear to be pointing at the space between the port and the tubing insertion.  If you're looking for a quick way to void your warranty you just found it.

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

The rad has 12 visible water channels with no immediately obvious damage to the fins between them,  We say this as it is not uncommon for rads to arrive with the consumer with bent or buckled fins.  No such problems here then.  There are mounting holes on both sides of the rad for the attachment of 120mm fans and Cooler Master have very thoughtfully included additional bolts in the accessories bags to enable this.

 Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review  

 

The cold plate although low profile looks quite rugged and chunky, with the Cooler Master name having the appearance of having been stamped into the back.  Contained in all this chunkiness is a small blue LED which subtly lights up the back of the cold plate when the pump is running.  The Tubing attaches via 90 degree elbows, with each elbow being able to rotate some 45 degrees in either direction.  A smartly braided power cable exits the cold plate from the side of the cylindrical edge.

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

The circular copper contact plate is smooth, having a slight brushed look to it, and with 12 screws holding the assembly together we think the chances of a leak here are next to zero.  Although circular the contact plate is plenty big enough to cover the heat plates of the CPUs specified. 

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review 

«Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next»

Most Recent Comments

03-04-2013, 09:51:58

Master&Puppet
Looks like a reasonable alternative to some of the mid-range tower coolers on cooler systems although it seems pretty noisy.Quote

03-04-2013, 09:53:19

barnsley
I was hoping you'd review this! I've been looking at AIO coolers for my new build for sometime and I wondered about this. Definitely going on my parts to buy list Quote

03-04-2013, 10:06:56

UkGouki
its a pretty good choice if you only wont a moderate overclock tbh im thinking of getting this as funds at the mo are tight and it will get me what i want out of my system Quote

03-04-2013, 12:29:02

lwatcdr
I just do not get it. Why does everyone just use fan controllers and such when modern Motherboards have fan headers and heat sensors. Why can't people set a max CPU temp of say 60c and let the computer spin the fan up and down as the load changes? You could then alway have the lowest noise for a given temp. Seems like this should be an automated function.Quote

03-04-2013, 14:20:06

alpenwasser
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwatcdr View Post
I just do not get it. Why does everyone just use fan controllers and such when modern Motherboards have fan headers and heat sensors. Why can't people set a max CPU temp of say 60c and let the computer spin the fan up and down as the load changes? You could then alway have the lowest noise for a given temp. Seems like this should be an automated function.
I can only speak for myself but I have yet to possess a motherboard that
  • has enough fan headers for my needs in the right locations and/or
  • provides enough power on its fan headers to power an array of fans,
  • provides enough power for a D5 pump (I know they can be hooked up to the PSU directly and the Vario can be adjusted without a fan controller, but it's much more comfortable not having to use the little nob on the pump's back, and yes, I do change my pump's speed from time to time, albeit not often) and
  • lets me define not only max temps but actual fan curves, because everything else is useless (to me, at least).

These are unlikely to change in the future. It's not really reasonable to build a M/B with 10 to 12 fan headers (which you can easily use with two radiators on push/pull or something comparable) or fan headers that can provide ~30 W of power for a pump (market is too small).

The fan curve thing should be feasible though, I'll admit. I don't want my fans spinning up to 100% when a certain max temp is hit, I want them to ramp up by maybe 20% to see if that's enough and then throttle down again.

If you look at a real fan controller like the Aquaero, that's a very complex tool. You don't just integrate something like that into a M/B. It is certainly feasible, but it would cost accordingly.

Overall I'd say cost is probably the reason why the M/B that fits my needs regarding fan control is unlikely to arrive any time soon, and as long as that I'll stick to fan controllers. Besides, I like fan controllers, they have knobs and buttons and displays and stuff Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.