OCZ Gladiator MAX CPU Cooler

Introduction

Introduction

Aftermarket heatsinks for Intels 1366 socket are starting to appear on the market now and OCZ's first entry is the Gladiator Max. While this heatsink is not directly compatible with skt1366 'out of the box' a separate backplate and i7 mount are now available to allow the cooler to be used on Intels latest CPU range. As OCZ have included this adaptor, it would be rude not to put the Gladiator Max through it's paces on an i7 based system, which is exactly what we intend to do.

The new Gladiator Max heatsink, hailing from OCZ technology, is the latest heatsink to carry a similar design to the popular Xigmatek HDT 1283/4 and OCZ's own Vendetta series. The technology behind this design, H.D.T (Heat-pipe Direct Touch), allows the four 8mm copper heat pipes of the Gladiator to come in direct contact with the IHS of your chosen CPU. As no base plate is used this should allow unrestricted conduction of heat from the IHS to the Heatpipes. The heat then travels up the heatpipes to the 40 Aluminium fin plates which are vectored to aid airflow, for the heat to be dissipated by the included 120mm fan.

Weighing in at 780 grams and standing 161mm tall no one can accuse the Gladiator Max of being a lightweight nor huge rather it is comparative to the high end coolers on the market today. OCZ do have a smaller version of the Gladiator available which is called just that, the Gladiator, minus the 'max' as the 'normal' gladiator carries a 92mm fan instead of the 120mm we have for todays review.

Let's hear what OCZ have to say about it:

Combining a distinctive stacked fin array, heat-pipe direct touch (HDT) design, and a large low-noise fan, the Gladiator series is built to take on the cooling challenges of today’s most powerful processors and ensure your system functions at its peak.

Utilizing the proven performance of the latest HDT design, the Gladiator series has direct contact with the processor using four copper heat pipes to ensure the most rapid heat transfer. The unique “folded” fin configuration also helps maximize surface area while maintaining a compact form factor.

Engineered to aggressively dissipate heat produced by high-speed CPUs, the Gladiator series can tackle any challenge in the overclocking arena. These coolers run quiet courtesy of a large fan mounted with anti-vibration rubber connectors to reduce excess noise, perfect for a media center or office desktop where silence is a top priority. The versatile and user-friendly Gladiator series is compatible with AMD AM2/939/754/755 and Intel 775 sockets and can be installed quickly and easily by end-users at all skill levels.


Specification

The specification below was taken directly from OCZ's website:

For Sockets AMD 754/755/939/940/AM2, Intel LGA775 *
4 Pure Copper heat pipes for superior heat dissipation
Pure Aluminum alloy fins for ultimate durability


Fan Specs
Size: 120mm x 120mm x 25mm
Weight: 780g (with fan)
Rated Voltage: 12V DC
Fan Speed: 800-1500RPM
Noise Level: 19.6-26.4 dBA
Bearing type: rifle
Life Expectancy: 40,000 hours
Connector: 4 pin with PWM

Dimensions:
Heatsink: (L)63 x (W)120 x (H)165mm

Includes:
120mm Fan with rubber connectors
Mounting Hardware for all above CPUs
Generic Thermal Compound
Installation Manual

Also included in todays review is the Socket 1366 kit, which while not warranting a separate review will be included in todays setup.

Let's take a look at the heatsink itself...
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Most Recent Comments

02-02-2009, 03:35:05

premiumgfx
The Gladiator looks like a solid performer. Great review.Has anyone patented HDT technology? I've seen some Xigmatek CPU coolers which use it too.Quote

02-02-2009, 04:55:18

w3bbo
Xigmatek were the first to use it iirc.Quote

02-02-2009, 04:59:15

monkey7
Hmm direct heatpipe touch :') Any chance of comparing it with the noctua U12P 1366 or a TRUE w/ bolt thru?Quote

02-02-2009, 05:00:17

w3bbo
I have a Noctua sat next to me but it isn't a review item sadly.Quote

02-02-2009, 05:12:59

WC Annihilus
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='w3bbo'
Xigmatek were the first to use it iirc.
Wrong actually. First to use it were Zaward. It's just that Xigmatek was the one to take it and really run with it.

Looks like a solid cooler. Shame they didn't bring in the dimpled fin design of the Vendetta seriesQuote
Reply
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