AMD Investor Presentation Reveals Ryzen 3rd Generation Threadripper

AMD Investor Presentation Reveals Ryzen 3rd Generation Threadripper

AMD Investor Presentation Reveals Ryzen 3rd Generation Threadripper

AMD has revealed a lot about their 2019 CPU plans over the past few months, detailing their planned Zen 2 EPYC processors in late 2018 and their AM4-based Ryzen 3rd Generation processors back at CES. Until now, the company has been silent regarding their next iteration of the Ryzen Threadripper series, at least until now. 

In the company’s March 2019 investors presentation,  AMD released a 2019 client roadmap that’s designed to deliver “non-stop product momentum”. For starters, AMD has confirmed that 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO Mobile is coming in Spring, reconfirmed that 3rd Generation Ryzen desktop processors are coming in mid-2019 and has also confirmed that 3rd Generation Threadripper will launch sometime after 3rd Generation Ryzen. 

What has been confirmed here is that 3rd Generation Threadripper is releasing in 2019. Our guess is that Ryzen 3rd Generation Threadripper processors will release in late Q3 or early Q4 2019, around a year after the release of AMD’s Ryzen 2nd Generation Threadripper products.

 AMD Investor Presentation Reveals Ryzen 3rd Generation Threadripper


So what can we expect from Threadripper 3rd Generation?
  
 
For starters, we can expect AMD to utilise the same 7nm Zen 2 cores as both Ryzen 3rd Generation and EPYC 2nd Generation, complete with a separate 14nm I/O chiplet. At this time it is unknown how many cores Threadripper 3rd Generation will offer, but the modular nature of AMD’s designs could allow up to 64 cores to be delivered on TR4, the same core count as AMD’s EPYC 2nd Generation products. 

AMD could release Threadripper 3rd Gen with the same core count as 2nd Gen, utilising AMD’s Zen 2 architecture and higher clock speeds to offer the bulk of its performance improvements, though it is also possible for AMD to deliver an intermediate core count boost. A 48 core model seems likely, with AMD saving a full 64 core offering for a later date. Does AMD really need 64 cores to beat Intel’s HEDT offerings in 2019? 

With Threadripper using the same CPU socket as EPYC, AMD can easily offer the same core counts as EPYC 2nd Generation. The question now is, will they?

You can join the discussion on AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper 3rd Generation processors on the OC3D Forums.