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AMD confirms that their EPYC processors will power Singapore's Fastest Supercomputer

AMD's 3rd Generation EPYC processors continue to be a huge success for AMD

AMD confirms that their EPYC processors will power Singapore's Fastest Supercomputer

AMD confirms that their EPYC processors will power Singapore's Fastest Supercomputer

AMD's Zen-based processors have been making major inroads within every area of the CPU market, from the consumer desktop market to laptops, servers and even supercomputers. With their Zen 3 architecture, AMD is pushing their market share gains further, securing several lucrative partnerships and multiple high-profile design wins.  

EPYC 7763 and EPYC 75F3 processors have been chosen to power a new supercomputer for the National Supercomputing Centre (NSCC) Singapore, offering an 8x performance uplift over their centre's existing ASPIRE1 supercomputer. While this supercomputer is also due to use Nvidia graphics cards, this supercomputing win is a big deal for AMD, confirming that the CPU maker is no longer an underdog within the CPU market. 

The NSCC's new supercomputer will feature nearly 900 CPU and GPU computing nodes, which will sport various configurations to cater to a multitude of potential workloads. The supercomputer is due to feature over 100,000 computing cores and be operational in early 2022.  

  

    AMD announced that AMD EPYC 7003 Series processors will be used to power a new supercomputer for the National Supercomputing Centre (NSCC) Singapore, the national high-performance computing (HPC) resource center dedicated to supporting science and engineering computing needs.

The system will be based on the HPE Cray EX supercomputer and will use a combination of the EPYC 7763 and EPYC 75F3 processors. The supercomputer is planned to be fully operational by 2022 and is expected to have a peak theoretical performance of 10 petaFLOPS, 8x faster than NSCC's existing pool of HPC resources. Researchers will use the system to advance scientific research across biomedicine, genomics, diseases, climate, and more.

AMD confirms that their EPYC processors will power Singapore's Fastest Supercomputer  

AMD's supercomputing wins are a clear sign of the company's transformation from an x86 underdog to an x86 frontrunner. Every interaction of AMD's Zen architecture has delivered strong performance gains, which has been more than enough to cause giants like Intel to stumble. Moving forward, AMD will need to work hard to maintain its growth trajectory, especially as companies like Amazon, Google, and Apple move to in-house processors for many of their workloads. 

You can join the discussion on AMD's EPYC processors powering Singapore's most powerful supercomputer on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

12-05-2021, 10:19:24

AngryGoldfish
I've always wondered what these supercomputers specifically do on a day to day basis.Quote

12-05-2021, 10:33:46

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngryGoldfish View Post
I've always wondered what these supercomputers specifically do on a day to day basis.
epeen competitions between the top scientists to see who can calculate the most accurate Pi in the fastest time Quote

12-05-2021, 17:31:48

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngryGoldfish View Post
I've always wondered what these supercomputers specifically do on a day to day basis.
It's in the article, "Researchers will use the system to advance scientific research across biomedicine, genomics, diseases, climate, and more."

So they will process whatever they need at that time. Anything that requires massive amounts of data processing and memory usage pretty much needs something of this scale. Depending on the task can take a few days, weeks, maybe months to complete.Quote

12-05-2021, 18:14:44

tgrech
There's also some single use ones like the large supercomputers the met office and similar organisations have for weather prediction/modellingQuote

13-05-2021, 10:52:38

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
There's also some single use ones like the large supercomputers the met office and similar organisations have for weather prediction/modelling
Pretty sure thats what NBD meant by climate.Quote
Reply
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