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AMD releases their Free NVMe RAID support for Threadripper

BIOS updates are required to enable this feature

AMD releases their Free NVMe RAID support for Threadripper

AMD releases their Free NVMe RAID support for Threadripper

 

AMD has officially unlocked NVMe RAID support on their X399 Threadripper CPU platform, allowing users to create bootable RAID arrays thanks to new X399 BIOS updates and a freely available Windows NVMe RAID driver. 

Alongside this support, AMD has also released a tool called RAIDXpert2, which AMD has created to allow users to create new NVMe RAID arrays or to monitor existing ones. Please note that creating a new RAID array will delete the data on the drives used, so please backup your data when creating a new RAID array. 

NVMe RAID on Threadripper is only supported on Windows 10 build 1703 or newer. AMD 's NVMe RAID driver is available to download here.  

Below is AMD's basic step-by-step guide to set up a NVMe RAID configuration on Threadripper. 

 

  • - Download the latest AMD RAIDXpert2 package to obtain the NVMe RAID driver and management software.
  • - Update the BIOS for your AMD X399-based motherboard to add BIOS support for NVMe RAID.
  • - Install two or more NVMe SSDs to your system.
  • - Create a new NVMe RAID array:
    1.       Method A: …Using your motherboard’s firmware. There will be a new menu in your BIOS, or a new menu accessible with a hotkey during POST. This will vary by model.
    2.       Method B: …using the AMD RAIDXpert2 software.
    3. - Make sure your disks do not contain important data!
  • - Just enjoy! No hardware activation keys, license fees, or arbitrary SSD restrictions apply. It’s that simple.

AMD releases their Free NVMe RAID support for Threadripper

(Click to see full-size image)

 

With these new updates, AMD users can now RAID up to six different NVMe SSDs, with AMD's testing showing a 5.38x gain in IOMeter throughput when using six NVMe SSDs. This setup allows six Samsung 960 Pro SSDs to offer over 21200MB/s reads, which is almost 40x faster than a high-performance SATA SSD.  

On AMD's X399 platform RAID-0, RAID-1 and RAID-10 are supported, with hot-swap options being available to RAID-1 and RAID-10 users. 


AMD releases their Free NVMe RAID support for Threadripper

(Click to see full-size image)

  

The lack of NVMe RAID support at launch was very disappointing for AMD's Threadripper platform, especially given the sheer number of PCIe lanes that are available to utilise. This allows AMD users to create huge NVMe RAID arrays, which may seem like a useless prospect to many consumers given the pricing of high-speed NVMe SSDs, but it is certainly of interest to those that can find a use for ultra-high speed non-volatile storage. 

 

You can join the discussion on AMD bringing NVMe RAID support to their X399 Threadripper CPU platform on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

02-10-2017, 14:37:20

cj09bruno
Considering intel released their version only a few months ago, and that version requires people to pay to access it and it only supports intel drives, i would say amd is the first to market with a solution that is actually usable, so "very disappointing" would not be the words i would useQuote

02-10-2017, 18:02:39

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by cj09bruno View Post
Considering intel released their version only a few months ago, and that version requires people to pay to access it and it only supports intel drives, i would say amd is the first to market with a solution that is actually usable, so "very disappointing" would not be the words i would use
While I agree saying "very disappointing" is the wrong phrase I'd use, my issue with this is that NVMe raid is so useless that does it matter it's barely 3 months(if that?) Delay? I do not think so.

The only thing we're it would benefit a person is when reading massive 4k/8k raw files in Premier and scrubbing timelines.Quote

02-10-2017, 22:40:16

Kleptobot
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
While I agree saying "very disappointing" is the wrong phrase I'd use, my issue with this is that NVMe raid is so useless that does it matter it's barely 3 months(if that?) Delay? I do not think so.

The only thing we're it would benefit a person is when reading massive 4k/8k raw files in Premier and scrubbing timelines.
Yes, because the only use of RAID is to get a speed boost.Quote

02-10-2017, 22:48:05

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kleptobot View Post
Yes, because the only use of RAID is to get a speed boost.
Yes because people will buy 2 very high TB NVMe drives and raid them in raid 1 because it's a cheap and sensible option. And to the ones that do? They can wait like they did. The whole 3 of them. Why delay a launch of over raid.Quote

02-10-2017, 23:03:51

S_I_N
Quote:
Originally Posted by cj09bruno View Post
Considering intel released their version only a few months ago, and that version requires people to pay to access it and it only supports intel drives, i would say amd is the first to market with a solution that is actually usable, so "very disappointing" would not be the words i would use
I'm not exactly sure what your referring to so excuse me if I'm wrong. But I have been using NVMe raid on intel since around Z270 launch which was Jan 5. I did not have to pay intel for it I am using intel drives though as that is all that was available to me at the time. All I had to do was set up the array and load the raid drives prior to opsys install.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
While I agree saying "very disappointing" is the wrong phrase I'd use, my issue with this is that NVMe raid is so useless that does it matter it's barely 3 months(if that?) Delay? I do not think so.

The only thing we're it would benefit a person is when reading massive 4k/8k raw files in Premier and scrubbing timelines.

I do raid 0 to get 2 drives spanned together making for a larger platform. I did NVMe raid 0 for epeen and to get a larger than 256 opsys drive. I agree speeds are not an issue once you go NVMe or even ssd for that matter lol. If a larger NVMe drive was available to me at the time I would of raided for a time to see raw performance then dropped it back to a single NVMe drive.Quote
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