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AMD's EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

AMD showcases the cost benefits of their MCM CPU designs

AMD's EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

AMD's EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

 
At Hot Chips 2017, AMD revealed some new info about their latest EPYC series of datacenter/enterprise CPUs,  detailing how AMD's Infinity Fabric tech works in greater detail while also informing attendees of the benefits of AMD's multi-chip-module (MCM) design. 
 
In AMD's analysis the found that creating the same 32-core processor with a single "monolithic" die would require a 777mm^2 package, rather than the 4x 213mm^2 (852mm^2 total) packages that AMD actually uses for EPYC. This smaller total die size is achieved by a monolithic design because several aspects of some of EPYC's 4 dies are redundant in an MCM config. One example is that each of AMD's EPYC dies has a server controller hub, where only one is needed.   
 
This 10% saving in die space is nothing compared to what AMD saved when moving to EPYC's MCM design, with AMD's smaller dies increasing yield and offering the ability to make a wider range of products with these same dies. Remember that Ryzen 3-7 and Ryzen Threadripper all use these same CPU dies, allowing AMD to benefit from both increased yield and higher rates of production.    
 
In total AMD says that their EPYC server chips cost a mere 59% of what a single die equivalent would cost, representing a 41% saving for AMD. This is said to include the additional costs that are incurred to create their MCM product designs.      

  

AMD's EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

(AMD Hot Chips 2017 Slide, Via Serve the Home)  

 

This huge saving showcases exactly why MCM product designs are so attractive, allowing AMD to release products which offer huge levels of performance while also coming with highly competitive pricing.

These savings also allows AMD to make decent margins on their EPYC server products, which will be invaluable to increasing AMD's profitability moving forward and funding further product development. 

 

You can join the discussion on the cost of AMD's EPYC CPUs on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

23-08-2017, 06:20:15

AlienALX
I think the best thing about AMD's design is the failure rates will be much, much lower due to using small dies in numbers. And any of these small dies that fail can simply be used for something else. If Intel's large die fails to the point it can't meet minimum spec on that chipset (so let's say they were trying to cut a 6950x and could use it as a 6800k if it failed) then the whole thing goes in the bin.

Yeah, it was very smart of Jim Keller to design it the way he did. Genius, even.Quote

23-08-2017, 08:09:06

Chopper3
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
I think the best thing about AMD's design is the failure rates will be much, much lower due to using small dies in numbers. And any of these small dies that fail can simply be used for something else. If Intel's large die fails to the point it can't meet minimum spec on that chipset (so let's say they were trying to cut a 6950x and could use it as a 6800k if it failed) then the whole thing goes in the bin.

Yeah, it was very smart of Jim Keller to design it the way he did. Genius, even.
You know that's not how Intel's fab setup works right? If say their 28c Xeon fails on a number of cores they just sell it as a lower-core'd SKU - so if 1 core is dead it becomes a 24c part, on an 18c Xeon if 3 cores fail then they sell it as a 14c part etc.Quote

23-08-2017, 09:36:51

NeverBackDown
Pretty impressive. This should really help AMD be profitableQuote

23-08-2017, 10:48:36

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopper3 View Post
You know that's not how Intel's fab setup works right? If say their 28c Xeon fails on a number of cores they just sell it as a lower-core'd SKU - so if 1 core is dead it becomes a 24c part, on an 18c Xeon if 3 cores fail then they sell it as a 14c part etc.
Yes but the problem is if it doesn't even meet the lowest part on X299 what can they do with it? make it a desktop part? I strongly doubt that, given the core is much larger and probably wouldn't even fit onto a desktop CPU part.

With Epyc/Threadripper/Ryzen they can use a part all the way down to a £99 CPU. So absolutely nothing at all goes to waste. I mean FFS they are even using fully functional dies as place mats !

Intel can not do that. That is the problem with making monolithic cores. It's the same when Nvidia make the Titan X. The only thing it can become is a 1080Ti and if it's not good enough for that it goes in the bin. This is why they charge such a high price for it.Quote

23-08-2017, 14:12:23

Thelosouvlakia
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post

With Epyc/Threadripper/Ryzen they can use a part all the way down to a £99 CPU. So absolutely nothing at all goes to waste. I mean FFS they are even using fully functional dies as place mats !

AMD has said that the "place mats" on the Threadripper chips is just cut silicon wafers for stability... Well either that or completely failed cpu dies...Quote
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