AMD's "Rembrandt" Ryzen 9 6980HX pushes Zen to 5 GHz

2022 is going to be a big year for AMD

AMD's

Could AMD's newest desktop SKUs push past 5 GHz? 

Specifications for AMD's upcoming "Rembrandt" series Zen 3+ processors have leaked via WCCFTECH, revealing some incredible specifications for AMD's upcoming Ryzen 6000 series mobile processors. 

With their flagship Ryzen 9 6980HX model, AMD plans to deliver users eight cores, sixteen threads and boost clock speeds that can reach as high as 5 GHz. That's right, 5 GHz. That's a first for Ryzen. While this mobile part seemingly needs a TDP of over 45 watts to achieve this, this is nonetheless a major achievement for AMD. 

Another major innovation for AMD's "Rembrandt" mobile CPUs is their use of an RDNA 2 integrated graphics component, which will significantly increase the GPU performance of AMD's latest Ryzen mobile processors. Add on DDR5 memory support, and AMD's latest mobile CPUs will be great low-end gaming solutions. 

Some of the performance gains from AMD's Ryzen 6000 series silicon apparently comes thanks to AMD's us of TSMC's 6 nm lithography node. This node is an enhanced form of 7nm that can deliver increased performance, greater transistor density, and greater power efficiency. These changes are all good news for AMD, especially within the mobile market. 

With AMD's Ryzen 9 6900HX, AMD's Rembrandt silicon will reportedly deliver users lower clock speeds than their Ryzen 9 6980HX, but offer users the same 8/16 core/thread count. With their Ryzen 9 6800H, AMD will offer lower clock speeds at a lower TDP of 35-45W. 

What about AMD's desktop parts? 

If AMD can achieve 5 GHz on a power-constrained mobile part, what will AMD be able to achieve with a desktop 6 nm Ryzen product? At CES 2022, AMD is expected to reveal new V-Cache enhanced Ryzen processors. Sadly, it is currently unknown whether these new processors will use 6 nm or 7 nm silicon. 

Should AMD use 6 nm to create V-Cache enhanced Ryzen 6000 series processors, AMD has the potential to deliver their customers higher clock speeds and more L3 cache with their next-generation processors. This delivers consumers two avenues that can deliver boosted performance, with 6nm enabling performance (clock speed) and power efficiency benefits while V-Cache enables more on-chip data storage/access and greater cache bandwidth.

If AMD moved Ryzen to 6 nm, there is no reason why AMD couldn't release 5+ GHz Ryzen processors. AMD representative have already suggested that AMD's Ryzen 5000 series Zen 3 processors are limited to boost clock of 4.9 GHz for binning reasons, suggesting that 5 GHz Ryzen processors are already possible (albeit in low volumes).  

AMD's

CES 2022 will be an interesting time for AMD, as the company's latest technologies will not benefit from a major architectural shift (Zen 4 isn't due until late 2022), or a major lithography node transition (6 nm is a refined version of 7 nm). If AMD can deliver excellent products without needing the benefits of Zen 4 or 5 nm, CES will be a hugely positive event for AMD. But can AMD deliver true generational leaps in performance without these changes? 

You can join the discussion on AMD's "Rembrandt" Ryzen 9 5980HX reportedly pushing Zen to 5 GHz on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

01-01-2022, 10:54:52

AngryGoldfish
If AMD has been holding back the news that Zen3+ V-cache will be on 6nm and reach 5Ghz+ are the better binned chips, they've done a great job holding that in and it could be a real hit against Intel who actually do have a good architecture.Quote
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