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Intel doubles its 14/10nm manufacturing capacity in 3 years

'Moving forward, we're not stopping...' claims Intel

Intel doubles its 14/10nm manufacturing capacity in 3 years

Intel doubles its 14/10nm manufacturing capacity in 3 years

PC isn't dead; it is growing. Intel, one of the leading manufacturers of computer processors, sees record demand in recent years, so much so that the company has had to double its manufacturing capacity (with 14nm and 10nm) over the past three years just to keep up with demand.

While Intel has seen growing competition within the PC and server markets, this competition has not had a huge impact on the market's demand for Intel silicon. In fact, Intel plans to continue investing in capacity expansion, as the needs of their customers are continuing to grow. 

The market's growing demand for Intel's processors has placed a huge strain on the company, forcing engineers to improve Intel's manufacturing capacity in many ways. For starters, Intel increased its manufacturing yields to obtain more usable chips per wafer, and existing fabs have had much of inner internal space repurposed to create more space for manufacturing. Office and lab space has been turned into manufacturing space, allowing Intel to expand their manufacturing operations at an astounding rate. 

Intel's Keyvan Esfarjani, the company's Senior Vice President of Manufacturing and Operations, has stated that the company is currently manufacturing 10nm products at three sites in Oregon, Arizona and Israel. Esfarjani says that "10nm progress is coming along quite well", and that all three 10nm sites are operating at "full steam". 

While Intel's progress with 10nm and future process nodes has been slow, it is undeniable that progress is being made. Intel has claimed that their 10nm SuperFin node offers "the largest single intranode enhancement in Intel’s history and delivers performance improvements comparable to a full-node transition." Even so, Intel has only released a small number of 10nm SuperFin products, and none of these products have been released into the desktop and server markets.

2021 should see Intel increase its proliferation of 10nm SuperFin processors within the CPU market, though it remains to be seen how this would look in reality. Even today, Intel's product line is mostly comprised of 14nm processors, a factor which is placing Intel behind its competitors in terms of power efficiency. 

Intel's record earnings have been powered by the company's recent capacity improvements, allowing the company to sell more processors while manufacturing them with increased efficiency. 

Despite Intel's claims that 10nm's "progress is coming along quite well", their 10nm and 7nm nodes are far behind schedule. Only time will tell how Intel's products will fare moving forward, especially as AMD continues to deliver strong competition within the x86 marketspace and ARM processors continue to increase market share within the high-performance processing market. 

You can join the discussion on Intel doubling its 14/10nm manufacturing capabilities in three years on the OC3D Forums


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Most Recent Comments

23-12-2020, 20:53:37

Kaapstad
No point doubling their manufacturing capacity if what they are making is obsolete.

Intel have spent the last 10 years spending very little on product innovation and have now got some very serious cheaper faster competition from AMD.Quote

23-12-2020, 21:09:14

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaapstad View Post
No point doubling their manufacturing capacity if what they are making is obsolete.

Intel have spent the last 10 years spending very little on product innovation and have now got some very serious cheaper faster competition from AMD.
Yeah, in the short term Intel has been able to generate a lot of profit in a short time, but things are going to get very tough for them if they don't start innovating.

Intel has let themselves fall behind as a fab and have allowed their architectural innovations to stagnate as a result. I hope Intel can get their act together and sort themselves out.Quote

23-12-2020, 21:25:50

looz
It can benefit them a fair bit in short term, having a slower product (which in server space, isn't even the case across the board) which is available today is certainly an advantage.Quote

24-12-2020, 10:16:46

ET3D
While Intel says that it's had to double capacity due to record demand, it's worth remembering that Intel now sells 10 core CPUs on the same process where its high end was 4 cores (with the same architecture) just 3 years ago. Even if demand was the same, supplying much larger chips would have required that doubling of capacity.Quote
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