Intel’s 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000

Intel's 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000

Intel’s 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000 

During their “Fall Desktop Launch Event”, Intel unveiled their XEON W-3175X processor, an unlocked 28-core processor which offers support for 6-channel DDR4 memory and clock speeds of up to 4.3GHz out of the box. Now, this processor has been listed online, with the retailer Kikatek giving it a price tag of £4,045.96 and an RRP of £5,999. 

Unlike other Xeon processors, Intel plans to make their W-3175X processor with support for overclocking, while also offering support ECC memory and other Xeon-grade features. Intel has confirmed that this CPU provides a base clock speed of 3.1GHz and a dual-core boost clock speed of 4.3GHz. The TDP of this processor is 255W.

To house these processors, Intel’s 28-core Xeon requires motherboards that are both server-grade and overclocking-ready. On this front, Intel has partnered with both ASUS and Gigabyte to offer mainboards that are capable of running these new processors at higher clock speeds to deliver industry-leading performance.

Intel has already announced plans to release their new Xeon W-3175X this December alongside supported motherboards from ASUS and Gigabyte. At this time Intel has not revealed this CPU’s release date, with the company rapidly running out of December to launch their new flagship overclocker

  

Intel's 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000  

One thing to note about the W-3175X processor is that it is not Soldered and uses the same polymer-based thermal paste as other Xeon processors.

The reason behind Intel’s decision to use polymer-based TIM is clear, as no other product in their LGA3647 product stack uses STIM (Soldered Thermal Interface Material), making its use unfeasible for a low-volume product like the Xeon W-3175X. Even so, this design decision makes it likely that pro overclockers will need likely need to delid their W-3175X processors to achieve peak performance, which something that nobody should have to do on a processor that will be worth multiple thousand dollars.

You can join the discussion on Intel’s unlocked 28-Core Xeon Processor and its early price listing on the OC3D Forums.