Making a cheap Ryzen 7000 system - CPU, motherboard, and DRAM prices have dropped

AM5 has gotten a lot more affordable, and not just because of Ryzen price cuts

Making a cheap Ryzen 7000 system - CPU, motherboard, and DRAM prices have dropped

AMD's AM5 ecosystem has become a lot more affordable

When AMD launched their Ryzen 7000 series of processors and their new AM5 CPU platform, one of the main criticisms that were levelled at AMD was the high costs of the company's latest product ecosystem. DDR5 memory was a lot more expensive than DDR5, AM5 motherboard prices were much higher than their AM4 counterparts, and even AMD's Ryzen 7000 series CPU prices were on the high side. Together, these factors made AMD's newest CPU platform unappealing to value-oriented PC builders, especially once Intel launched their 13th Generation Raptor Lake processors. 

The good news today is that AMD's AM5 platform has gotten a lot less expense in recent weeks, with the introduction of AMD's B650 chipset lowering baseline AM5 motherboard costs, DDR5 prices steadily creeping down, and new Ryzen 7000 CPU price cuts lowering the cost of AMD's CPUs themselves. Today, AMD's AM5 platform is a lot more affordable than it was, and things are likely to get better in the future.

Lowered CPU prices

Let's start off with AMD's new Ryzen 7000 series CPU price cuts, which have seen the value of AMD's Ryzen 7000 series CPUs drop by between £75 and £120. AMD's Ryzen 5 7600X and Ryzen 7 7700X have seen the most dramatic price cuts, with both CPUs receiving price cuts of over 15%. On the high-end, AMD's Ryzen 7000 series price cuts have a lower impact in percentage terms, though they remain significant.   

Today's Ryzen CPU prices (Amazon UK)

- Ryzen 5 7600X - Was £346.66 - Now £269.00

- Ryzen 7 7700X - Was £439.99 - Now £369.98

- Ryzen 9 7900X - Was £599.99 - Now £510.16

- Ryzen 9 7950X - Was £769.99 - Now £651.97

Making a cheap Ryzen 7000 system - CPU, motherboard, and DRAM prices have dropped

AMD has launched lower-cost AM5 motherboards

At launch, the cheapest AM5 motherboard that we cold find was available for around £270. This motherboard was a X670 motherboard, and AMD had promised that cheaper B650 based motherboards would arrive within a few weeks. Now, B650 motherboards are available, and their prices start below £200. 

Below we have linked two of the cheapest B650 motherboards that we can find, the ASUS PRIME B650M-A, and ASROCK's B650M PG Riptide. Both of these motherboards support PCIe 5.0 storage, DDR5 memory, and feature multiple M.2 slots for modern SSD storage devices. 

Sub-£200 B650 Motherboards  

- ASUS Prime B650M-A Micro-ATX DDR5 Motherboard - £184.12 (Amazon UK)

- ASROCK B650M PG Riptide DDR5 motherboard - £179.99 (Overclockers UK)

Making a cheap Ryzen 7000 system - CPU, motherboard, and DRAM prices have dropped

DDR5 memory is becoming more affordable

While DDR5 pricing remains high, the new DRAM type has become a lot more affordable, and Black Friday has given PC builders an opportunity to grab a 32GB kit of DDR5-6000 memory for under £160. When AMD's Ryzen 7000 series launched, a 2x16 GB DDR5-5200 memory kit at £169.99 was considered good value, which shows how things have changed for the DDR5 memory ecosystem. The kit we have linked below from ADATA is both cheaper and faster than the value kits that were available when AMD's Ryzen 7000 series launched.

Yes, cheaper 2x 8GB DDR5 memory kits are available, but we do not recommend these chips as they only feature 4 memory ICs. The smallest DDR5 memory ICs are 16Gb (2GB), which means that 8GB (2 DDR5 IC) DDR5 chips can handle fewer parallel operations and will therefore deliver lower levels of memory performance. For this reason, we don't believe 8GB DDR5 DRAM modules to be a worthwhile purchase.

A great price for DDR5 6000 memory - (Amazon UK)

- ADATA CASTER DDR5-6000 CL40 Memory - £158.50 (Black Friday Deal)

Bringing it all together

When AMD launched its Ryzen 7000 series, we discussed the high costs that were associated with AMD's AM5 platform in detail (more information here). Back then, upgrading to a Ryzen 5 7600X with an AM5 motherboard and 32GB of DDR5 would cost a little under £765. Now, buying the same CPU with a basic B650 motherboard and the DDR5 DRAM linked above would cost around £610. That's a platform cost decrease of around £155, and that's with a much faster kit of DDR5 memory (DDR5-5200 VS DDR5-6000). You could upgrade to a Ryzen 7 7700X and still have a lower platform cost than a day-1 Ryzen 5 7600X build. 

In time, we expect AMD's AM5/Ryzen 7000 series platform costs to lower. In time, non-X Ryzen 7000 series CPUs could launch with lower prices, lower-cost AM5 motherboards could become available, and DDR5 DRAM pricing should continue to lower.

AMD's AM5 platform is no longer as horrendously expensive as it once was, and if you hunt for some good hardware deals, you might even be able to get some better value from your latest PC purchases.    

You can join the discussion on AMD's Ryzen 7000 series CPUs and AM5 CPU platform becoming more affordable on the OC3D Forums.  

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Most Recent Comments

22-11-2022, 06:20:02

Peace
That's very appealing to see! Do the chipsets even differ by a lot this time and who does actually need an X mainboard? I've read that this time, the chipsets are almost identical in their feature sets.Quote

22-11-2022, 08:02:52

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peace Ð View Post
That's very appealing to see! Do the chipsets even differ by a lot this time and who does actually need an X mainboard? I've read that this time, the chipsets are almost identical in their feature sets.
Very very few. Ive noticed that in gaming there is almost zero performance lost between my 11900k boosting to 5ghz, and disabling turbo altogether (staying at 3.5ghz).

The benefits are less power draw and lower temps. Next time, I dont even know if I will bother with K series unless i know ill get bottlenecked with my gpuQuote

22-11-2022, 08:04:19

ET3D
The difference is mainly in whether PCIe 5.0 is available. Lower end boards have only PCIe 4.0 for the GPU slots, and the lowest end boards don't even have PCIe 5.0 for the NVMe slot.

Higher end boards also have USB 4.0, which isn't available in lower end boards.

Don't know if any of this matters to you. It doesn't really matter to me. But that was always the case. B series motherboards were always perfectly fine for the average buyer.Quote

22-11-2022, 08:26:52

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by ET3D View Post
The difference is mainly in whether PCIe 5.0 is available. Lower end boards have only PCIe 4.0 for the GPU slots, and the lowest end boards don't even have PCIe 5.0 for the NVMe slot.

Higher end boards also have USB 4.0, which isn't available in lower end boards.

Don't know if any of this matters to you. It doesn't really matter to me. But that was always the case. B series motherboards were always perfectly fine for the average buyer.
B series would be fine for many enthusiasts too, for the very same reason you mentioned above. We just always want the best with little justification as to why.Quote

22-11-2022, 09:11:24

WYP
The higher-end boards mostly offer better I/O and more PCIe 5.0. Ultimately, whether or not that matters to you depends on your use case. For most gamers, the cheaper boards are more than good enough.Quote
Reply
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