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Report claims that there is "no reason" why Z370 can't support Kaby Lake

Are Intel really restricting Z370's firmware?

Report claims that their is

Report claims that there is "no reason" why Z370 can't support Kaby Lake

 
A report from Guru3D has stated that Intel is intentionally restricting backwards compatibility on their Z370 chipset, with the publication stating that several of Intel board customers have told them that backward compatibility could merely be a firmware update away. 
 
If this is true, Intel has restricted the firmware of their new Z370 chipset to prevent Kaby-Lake CPUs from functioning on the platform. This will prevent any form of backwards compatibility on new Z370 motherboards, despite the fact that it is easily possible with the right firmware changes. 
 
This does not necessarily mean that Coffee Lake CPUs could function properly on Z270 motherboards, as Z370 motherboards are designed to be able to deliver more power to certain regions of the CPU and provide a different voltage path. Sadly, the exact changes that have been made to Z370 to support Intel's additional CPU cores are unknown.  
 
 

  

Report claims that their is

 

It is understandable why Intel would restrict Z370 in this way, provided this information is true, as Z370 backwards compatibility would add a lot of confusion into the mix, likely causing many to assume that Z270 or even Z170 motherboards also support Coffee Lake, given their use of the same LGA 1151 socket design. 

Even so, this would be a rather poor excuse from Intel, though it is unlikely that we will ever get any official verification on this matter unless a Kaby-Lake compatible Z370 firmware start leaking online. 

 

You can join the discussion on Intel's reported firmware restrictions on Z370 on the OC3D Forums.  

  

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Most Recent Comments

25-09-2017, 11:02:00

Dicehunter
I know the reason, Greed, Plain and simple, Greed.Quote

26-09-2017, 05:34:16

Gothmoth
LOL....

Quote:
It is understandable why Intel would restrict Z370 in this way, provided this information is true, as Z370 backwards compatibility would add a lot of confusion into the mix, likely causing many to assume that Z270 or even Z170 motherboards also support Coffee Lake, given their use of the same LGA 1151 socket design.
yeah and as we all know avoiding confusion is a top priority at intel.

that is why we get kaby lake-x cpus who can only use half the memory slots on x299.
and all the PCI lane mess on x299 is all to avoid confusion. Quote

26-09-2017, 05:47:01

Kaapstad
Too much backwards compatibility in intel CPUs which makes them slow and clumsy compared to newer options.Quote

02-10-2017, 12:09:18

TheF34RChannel
For those haters immediately jumping to conclusions:

Coffee Lake vs KBL/SKL Pin Diagrams: 146 vs 128 VCC Pins

https://www.reddit.com/r/hardware/co...46_vs_128_vcc/

And more here: http://www.pcgameshardware.de/Coffee...Grund-1240154/

Translation: Intel had allocated some pins, which had previously supplied the integrated graphics unit with power, to the CPU cores. In addition, there have been unused pins, which are already used by the motherboard manufacturers for voltage supply. On the Z270 boards, Intel had assigned this a fixed function. The result: Coffee-Lake S-CPUs could literally burn on high-end Z270 models, because they got too high tensions over these pins.

Now let's give this a rest.Quote

02-10-2017, 12:21:43

Dicehunter
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheF34RChannel View Post
For those haters immediately jumping to conclusions:

Coffee Lake vs KBL/SKL Pin Diagrams: 146 vs 128 VCC Pins

https://www.reddit.com/r/hardware/co...46_vs_128_vcc/

And more here: http://www.pcgameshardware.de/Coffee...Grund-1240154/

Translation: Intel had allocated some pins, which had previously supplied the integrated graphics unit with power, to the CPU cores. In addition, there have been unused pins, which are already used by the motherboard manufacturers for voltage supply. On the Z270 boards, Intel had assigned this a fixed function. The result: Coffee-Lake S-CPUs could literally burn on high-end Z270 models, because they got too high tensions over these pins.

Now let's give this a rest.
Or looking at in from a neutral point of view instead of labelling everyone a hater that criticises a brand, Maybe a lot of people have simply gotten used to Intels new socket every year tactic which in some cases was a bit unnecessary.Quote
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