Retested Ryzen 7 2700X VS i9-9900K benchmarks from Principled Technologies reveals smaller performance gap

Retested Ryzen 7 2700X VS i9-9900K benchmarks from Principled Technologies reveals smaller performance gap

Retested Ryzen 2700X VS i9-9900K benchmarks from Principled Technologies reveals smaller power gap

Last week a Principled Technologies released a report which called Intel’s upcoming i9-9900K CPU the “world’s fastest gaming processor”, quickly coming under fire for testing AMD processors in a manner which could be considered unfair, presenting results which favoured Intel’s upcoming 8-core processor. 

One of the main problems with Principled Technologies’ methods was their use of “Game Mode” within AMD’s Ryzen Master utility, which halves the Ryzen 7 2700X’s core count. By using this feature, Principled Technologies was comparing a quad-core processor to an Intel eight-core processor. 

Since their “misleading” benchmarking methods came to light, Principled Technologies promised to deliver a new set of results which would test AMD’s Ryzen 7 2700X in “Creative Mode”, disabling Game Mode to allow the processor to use all of its eight cores and sixteen threads in modern games. As expected, this change resulted in performance numbers which gave AMD a clear advantage over Intel in terms of value for money. 

Right now, AMD’s Ryzen 7 2700X is available for purchase for £289.99 (at Overclockers UK) and Intel’s i9-9900K is available to pre-order for £599.99 (at Overclockers UK), making Intel’s processor over 2x as expensive as AMD’s desktop flagship. To offer more value for money, Intel needs to provide a performance increase of over 2x to be seen as worthwhile. In actuality, Intel’s performance sees a maximum of 48.4%, but this value is in a game that runs at almost 300FPS on AMD hardware (Counter-Strike: Global Offensive), making this game feel cherry picked at best and deliberately misrepresentative at worst. 

With Principled Technologies’ latest results, we can see the performance advantage of the Intel i9-9900K drop from 51.9% to 17.8% in Total War: Warhammer II when testing the game using the title’s “The Lab” mode, from 42.9% to 26.9% in Gears of War 4 and from 57.2% to 17.7% in Ashes of the Singularity. This performance gap can be as low as 3% when Final Fantasy XV’s benchmark is tested. Allowing all of the Ryzen 7 2700X’s cores to remain active has enabled AMD’s processor to offer results that are reasonably close to Intel’s i9-9900K at 1080p when using a GTX 1080 Ti, close enough to imagine that this performance gap would all but disappear at higher resolutions like 1440p or 4K. 
  

Retested Ryzen 7 2700X VS i9-9900K benchmarks from Principled Technologies reveals smaller performance gap
Intel’s commissioned report from Principled Technologies may have confirmed that their i9-9900K is the best gaming processor on the market, it has also confirmed that AMD’s Ryzen 7 2700X offers significantly more value for money, something that will no doubt make the £599.99 i9-9900K hard to recommend. 

Principled Technologies’ updated report is available to read here. 

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