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Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?

Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?

Skylake delidding improved thermals

Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?

 

Japanese Publication PC Watch has delidded Skylake revealing a tiny CPU die and a much thinner IHS, than previous generation Broadwell and Haswell based CPUs. 

Despite being on the same 14nm FinFET process, Intel's new Skylake i7 6700K is significantly smaller than their Broadwell based i7 5775C, which is simply down to the integrated GPU within the Skylake chip itself. The broadwell based 5775C has over 2x the GPU execution units as it's Skylake equivalent, 48 compared to 24, and has a 128MB SRAM Cache for the iGPU.

Right now it is unclear why Intel has given the Skylake 6700K a lesser GPU then it's predecessor, but it likely attributed to Intel wanting to decrease power consumption or to cut costs. Remember that a smaller and less complex chip is easier to produce and is less prone to yield issues.     

  

Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  

 

 PC Watch has used the popular vice method for deliding their i7 6700K, but it is worth noting that this method is somewhat more dangerous than with previous generation Intel CPUs, as the substrate of the CPU is much thinner. With Skylake the IHS is only 0.8m thick, compared to Haswell which is 1.1mm thick. 

Skylake does use a thicker IHS (integrated heatspreader), so there should be no compatibility issues with existing socket 1150/1151 coolers. 

 

Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  

 

After delidding their i7 6700K PC Watch tested the CPU with different thermal compounds and compared it to the temperatures of the stock CPU. Testing was conducted using Cryorig R1 Ultimate cooler and was tested at stock speeds and with a light overclock of 4.6GHz at 1.325V on an ASUS Z170-A motherboard. 

These tests were conducted with stock TIM, Prolimatech PK-3 and Cool Laboratory Pro thermal compounds, with Intel's stock solution being easily beat by both aftermarket compounds. 

 

Skylake delidding, Does it improve Thermals?  

With the Cool Laboratory TIM we see the most significant decreased in thermals, with the CPU dropping from 74 degrees to 58 degrees at stock settings and from 88 degrees to 68 degrees at an overclock of 4.6GHz. These results are highly significant, showing again that Intel's thermal solution is simply not as good as it can be, which will again force professional overclockers and enthusiasts to delid their chips in order to get the best thermal performance. 

 

You can join the discussion on Delidding Skylake on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

10-08-2015, 07:26:25

Thelosouvlakia
WOW
those temps with the coolaboratory stuff!!!!!

However I've been wondering, why doesn't intel use a better TIM on the die? Ok silicon lottery is silicon lottery but Intel can improve the TIM so everyone gets lower temps, they could partner up with coolaboratory and use that stuff for the i7s

Unless they plan doing something similar with the 1150 Haswels and Devils Canyon....Quote

10-08-2015, 07:30:12

TPC
it's because money, they try to save any cent they can.Quote

10-08-2015, 07:30:51

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thelosouvlakia View Post
WOW
those temps with the coolaboratory stuff!!!!!

However I've been wondering, why doesn't intel use a better TIM on the die? Ok silicon lottery is silicon lottery but Intel can improve the TIM so everyone gets lower temps, they could partner up with coolaboratory and use that stuff for the i7s

Unless they plan doing something similar with the 1150 Haswels and Devils Canyon....
I imagine it is to keep costs down, though it also forces high end overclockers to break their warranties in a way intel can obviously spot.

the thing is that that changing the way they do thing doesn't help Intel much, after all they are literally the only horse in the high end market, so why compete with yourself.

A bit cynical, but true.Quote

10-08-2015, 08:01:38

Dicehunter
If they spent maybe 20 cents more on each CPU's TIM, Thermals wouldn't a be a problem.

Hell they could even add that 20 cents on to the end cost of the CPU.Quote

10-08-2015, 08:11:21

SuB
20 cents in a 'this is what it costs to do' end does not equal 20 cents at the customer buying the chip end.

There is an awful lot of logistics you have to take into account and that will all multiply out to quite a significant bit of cost to the end-user eventually. Nothing is cheap when it gets into the final user's hands.

Surprised they didn't try ultra as well as pro
20 degrees is pretty ridiculous though, that paste might as well be flipping mayonaise at this pointQuote
Reply
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