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AMD is NOT limiting colour depth on HDMI 2.0

AMD is NOT limiting colour depth on HDMI 2.0

AMD is NOT limiting colour depth on HDMI 2.0

AMD is NOT limiting colour depth on HDMI 2.0

 
Over this weekend I have found that a lot of misinformation has been spread online regarding AMD's ability to display HDR ready content using HDMI 2.0, particularly in the few HDR ready gaming titles that are available. 
 
In contrary to what some online publications may be telling you, AMD is NOT limiting HDR colour depth when using HDMI 2.0, with the HDMI standard itself being the limiting factor. Right now we assume that this release of false information is due to a lack of research on the part of writers working that these publications and we will not mention them any further. Now let's set the record straight. 
 
Now let's set the record straight, the problem here lies with the HDMI standard itself and not with AMD, as even Nvidia has the same issues when using HDMI to display HDR content at 4K. 

  

AMD is NOT limiting colour depth on HDMI 2.0  

To put things simply HDMI 2.0 was designed for 4K and was never intended fully support HDR, at least at YCrBr 4:4:4 colour spaces at anything higher than 8-bit colour. This makes things problematic for HDR content, as anything HDMI 2.0 does not have enough bandwidth to support HDR at a full YCrBr colour sampling of 4:4:4 and instead needs to compress the signal to YCrBr 4:2:2 or 4:2:0. 

We will need to wait for HDMI 2.1 or another future standard before we will get to play HDR content on at 4K with a full chroma colour sampling, with current HDR standards like HDR10 and Dolby Vision relying on Chroma Sub-Sampling to playback HDR content using HDMI 2.0. 


AMD is NOT limiting colour depth on HDMI 2.0  

To be clear AMD does support HDR standards like HDR10 and Dolby Vision, with these standards relying on Chroma Sub-Sampling to play 10-bit and 12-bit HDR content at a chroma sub-sampling on 4:2:2. HDMI does not support 10-bit or 12-bit displays with a full chroma sampling of 4:4:4 as it simply does not have enough bandwidth to do so. 

What should be taken away from this article is that HDMI is holding modern display technology back, first limiting 4K TVs to 30Hz while we waited for HDMI 2.0 and now limiting 4K HDR to a chroma sampled content while we wait for the next iteration of the standard. 

HDMI has long held back displays while DisplayPort has always been there to offer additional bandwidth for the displays of tomorrow, rather than just the displays of yesterday. It is baffling that the display community has not abandoned HDMI for DisplayPort, especially since DisplayPort is a royalty-free standard. 

 

You can join the discussion on HDMI holding back the display industry on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

20-11-2016, 12:28:58

Tripp
Didn't realise we had Hdr capable monitors out yet?Quote

20-11-2016, 12:36:22

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripp View Post
Didn't realise we had Hdr capable monitors out yet?
HDR is a very strange standard, right now it is only really supported on high-end £1000+ TVs.

Right now the HDR10 standard is 10-bit colour with 4:2:2 chroma sub-sampling and Dolby Vision is HDR with 12-bit colour and 4:2:2 chroma.

The main thing for HDR is all about high-end panels which can make full advantage of the extra colour gamut. This is especially true with modern OLED displays and Samsung new Quantum dot displays.Quote

20-11-2016, 12:41:32

NeverBackDown
Yeah I really don't know why people even care about HDMI. Why haven't we moved on to DP? It been faster for years and already offers HDR, Adaptive Sync, and still able to transfer audio. There's not much more 99℅ the average user will need? Adapters natively will work so if everyone moved on, it wouldn't take that long to switch and we would get a larger feature that companies can take advantage of. Considering how TV companies like to market the next big thing, you'd really ponder onto why DP hasn't been raced to implementQuote

20-11-2016, 14:11:26

Dicehunter
Give me the choice to buy a 4K 144Hz IPS 32" HDR Freesync monitor and I'll be all over that like white on rice.Quote

20-11-2016, 14:22:47

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicehunter View Post
Give me the choice to buy a 4K 144Hz IPS 32" HDR Freesync monitor and I'll be all over that like white on rice.
you better be prepared to wait for that as DP 1.4 won't even cover that.


DP 1.3 should be enough for 100-120ish Hz 4K, with DP 1.4 being enough for 4K 96Hz with HDR according to AMD.

https://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/arti...12126200l.jpeg

Thankfully DP1.4 should be faster to implement than 1.3, as it uses an almost lossless compression method to almost double the bandwidth.

DP1.4 will be added to things through software, which is why Polaris and Pascal GPUs are said to already support it.


The main problem with HDR is that it needs some super high-end displays to support it properly. Any low-end TV that supports it will likely only support it partially (only the deeper blacks but no enhanced colour, or doesn't have a good enough backlight).Quote
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