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AMD to make Exascale HSA Enabled Supercomputing chips

New PageAMD to make Exascale HSA Enabled Supercomputing chips

AMD to make Exascale HSA Enabled Supercomputing chips

AMD to make Exascale HSA Enabled Supercomputing chips

 

AMD to make Exascale HSA Enabled supercomputing chips, which may be the future of efficient supercomputing.

As many of you know power is not an infinite resource and every computer chip has it's own thermal limit, with that in mind modern supercomputers mainly are built with efficiency in mind, not just overall performance.  one of the main ways of increasing efficiency is to place workloads onto suitable hardware, with highly parallel computing tasks being mostly moved to GPUs and more less parallel tasks being used on traditional CPUs.

AMD believe the future is in HSA, Heterogeneous Computing, where tasks can be completed CPU and GPU hardware at the same time, allowing both types of hardware to work much more effectively by moving workloads to the most suitable piece of hardware while utilizing a unified pool of memory. 

A paper detailing this future can be found here, but sadly requires a subscription. Here is a quote form the paper. 

 

“Hardware optimized for specific functions is much more energy efficient than implementing those functions with general purpose cores. However, there is a strong desire for supercomputer customers to not have to pay for custom components designed only for high-end HPC systems, and therefore high-volume GPU technology becomes a natural choice for energy-efficient data-parallel computing.”

  AMD to make Exascale HSA Enabled Supercomputing chips

Inside this paper we see this, a model for a future chip which will contain 32 CPU cores and a very large GPU die, all connected to HBM (Die-Stacked DRAM) on a silicon interposer. It is likely that this chip will have 32GB of HBM 2.0 memory, with off package RAM available to the chip when required. 

This chip will be most likely utilizing CPU cores using AMD's new Zen architecture, which will be AMD's all new architecture which will feature great gains in both per core performance and CPU efficiency.  

 

 

Right now it is unknown when AMD will be creating this chip, or any similar design, but it is expected that they will be creating working samples in the 2016-2017 timeframe, with availability of this chip coming sometime before or during 2020. 

 

You can join the discussion on AMD's new Supercomputing APUs on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

03-08-2015, 16:26:12

NeverBackDown
32 cores, on die GPU, on die 32GB of HBM2.0, HSA... sounds like a dream more than reality. That die would be so large and that interposer would need to be even larger.Quote

03-08-2015, 17:15:48

Agost
Yeah, stuff, but no consumer software will benefit from HSA.

Current consumer programs don't even use not-so-recent instructions ( like AVX and stuff ) and that's why we see so little improvement over CPU generations. Most programs are made with old CPU compatibility in mind... like Pentium 3.Quote

03-08-2015, 17:19:37

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agost View Post
Yeah, stuff, but no consumer software will benefit from HSA.

Current consumer programs don't even use not-so-recent instructions ( like AVX and stuff ) and that's why we see so little improvement over CPU generations. Most programs are made with old CPU compatibility in mind... like Pentium 3.
Consumer software doesn't matter. These CPUs in the article are for Supercomputers where they do take advantage of hardware implementations like HSA.Quote

03-08-2015, 18:47:39

Agost
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Consumer software doesn't matter. These CPUs in the article are for Supercomputers where they do take advantage of hardware implementations like HSA.

I know, I was stressing the fact that we'll probably never use new software tech in a long time, even if it's already availableQuote

04-08-2015, 01:47:22

Kleptobot
I seem to remember that the amd apu graphics performance was highly dependant on memory bandwidth. Will be interesting to see how HBM will affect thisQuote
Reply
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