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AMD Tonga GPU die image shows 384-bit memory bus

AMD Tonga GPU die image shows 384-bit memory bus

AMD Tonga GPU die image shows 384-bit memory bus

AMD Tonga GPU die image shows 384-bit memory bus

 

During AMD's Carrizo APU presentation, the first die shots of the Tonga GPU were shown. The pictures were analyzed by members of the Beyond3D forums, and they concluded that the Tonga GPU will probably feature a 384-bit memory controller. The Tonga GPU has been used in AMD GPUs before: the R9 285 which was the replacement of the R9 280, and the M295X, which was made for Apple's 5K iMac.

 

 AMD Tonga GPU die image shows 384-bit memory busImage courtesy of PCGamesHardware.de

The R9 285 had a 256-bit memory bus and 1792 stream processors with 2GB of VRAM, while the R9 M295X featured 2048 stream processors with 4GB of VRAM. Both of these chips had the latest iteration of GCN architecture. The R9 285 wasn't a full Tonga GPU, and AMD was rumored to launch an R9 285X, but that never happened. Instead, we will get an R9 380 and R9 380X.

The R9 380 will basically be a R9 285 rebrand, but the R9 380X is a whole other story. It will house a fully enabled Tonga XT GPU with 2048 stream processors, 128 TMUs and 32 ROPs. Aside from that, it will also house a 384-bit bus, as opposed to the R9 285's (and thus the R9 380's) 256-bit bus. The images of the chip show sic 64-bit memory controllers. You do the math, 64 x 6 = 384. The R9 380x will likely feature 3GB of VRAM, instead of 2GB on the R9 285. A full list of rumoured specs can be found below:

 AMD Radeon R9 380AMD Radeon R9 M295XAMD Radeon R9 380x
Compute Units 28 32 32
Stream Processors  1792  20482048 
Memory Bus256-bit 256-bit 256-bit 
ROPs32 32 32 
TMUs112 128 128 
Clock SpeedTBA 850 MHz TBA 
VRAM2GB 4GB 3-6GB 
Die Size359mm²359mm² 359mm² 
TDP 190W~100W ~190W 

 

Join the discussion on the AMD Tonga GPU die images on the OC3D Forums.

 

During AMD's Carrizo APU presentation, the first die shots of the Tonga GPU were shown. These show a 384-bit memory bus,...

Posted by OC3D on Friday, 5 June 2015
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Most Recent Comments

05-06-2015, 07:38:48

Thelosouvlakia
Hmm I'm wondering whether this will help developers, reading/writing compressed data means productivity improvements!Quote

05-06-2015, 08:10:09

Tripp
you need to change the memory bus on the comparison img Quote

05-06-2015, 08:20:38

barnsley
Well the 280/280x were excellent value for money. Here's hoping they can continue that with the 380/380x. AMD are often the best choice at the £150-£200 mark so they can't really afford to screw it up.Quote

05-06-2015, 09:20:41

Kushiro
At least they are getting more attention than nVidia did for it.Quote

05-06-2015, 09:45:16

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by barnsley View Post
Well the 280/280x were excellent value for money. Here's hoping they can continue that with the 380/380x. AMD are often the best choice at the £150-£200 mark so they can't really afford to screw it up.
Whats annoying me is everyone classing the 380 etc as a rebrand. Its NOT!

its a respin product. they will give a new bios, new firmware etc. Rebranding is just slapping on a new logo and name. I seriously doubt AMD would dare to do that. I'm expecting these respin cards to have a nudge extra in performance over its previous series.Quote
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