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ASUS Release their MG248Q 1080p 144Hz FreeSync Monitor

ASUS Release their MG248Q 1080p 144Hz FreeSync Monitor

ASUS Release their MG248Q 1080p 144Hz FreeSync Monitor

ASUS Release their MG248Q 1080p 144Hz FreeSync Monitor

 

ASUS has grown to become one of the most popular makers of gaming monitors in recent years, offering monitors with functional and aesthetically pleasing stand designs.  

Now ASUS has added to their FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync monitor range by adding a 144Hz 1080p model to the range which features a high-speed TN panel. 

While this monitor may not be part of the ASUS Republic of Gamers range, it still offers everything that you would expect from a high-end ASUS gaming Monitor, with support for Adaptive Refresh rates with VESA Adaptive Sync/AMD FreeSync and offers a robust and highly adjustable stand. 

  ASUS Release their MG248Q 1080p 144Hz FreeSync Monitor

  

One of the best selling points of ASUS' gaming monitors has always been their stand design, offering great swivel, tilt, pivot and height adjustment options, which is one of the many reasons why ASUS has been making such gains in the monitor gaming market. 

For connectivity, the monitor will support DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 1.4 and DVI for connectivity as well as a 3.5mm headphone jack.

One of the biggest updates to AMD FreeSync since launch is the addition of AMD's LFC, Low Framerate Compensation, technology, which allows AMD FreeSync to function outside of the monitors traditional FreeSync range, in a similar way to how Nvidia's G-Sync technology currently functions. 

LFC Technology work on all FreeSync monitors with a wide enough FreeSync range, with AMD stating that they need a maximum FreeSync refresh rate that is at least 2.5X the minimum refresh rate of the monitor, so not all FreeSync monitors can use AMD's LFC technology. 

The ASUS MG248Q has a FreeSync Range of 40-144Hz, allowing LFC to allow Adaptive-Sync/FreeSync to function at framerates below 40, effectively giving the monitor an effective FreeSync range of 1-144Hz. 

 

AMD Radeon Software Crimson

 

One of the best things about this monitor in my eyes is that ASUS have actually defined that Adaptive Refresh/FreeSync Range of the display, purchasers to know exactly what to expect out of the display when using AMD FreeSync. 

ASUS offer some of the best gaming displays on the market, so it is great to see ASUS widening their FreeSync offerings with new 1080p display. 

One other thing to note here is that ASUS' FreeSync monitors tend to be much more affordable than their G-Sync counterparts, meaning that these monitors should come in with very good pricing. ASUS has now officially launched these new FreeSync panels to the market, so we should be seeing them hit store shelves soon. 

 

You can join the discussion on ASUS' MG248Q 1080p 144Hz FreeSync Gaming Monitor on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

15-04-2016, 18:17:44

Kushiro
Was really hoping for it to be IPS even though TN is in general better for gaming.Quote

15-04-2016, 21:09:33

King of Old Old School
Faceplam another 24 inch monitor WTF ASUS.

Need bigger sizes 24 inch is just way to small.Quote

15-04-2016, 21:32:47

jimma47
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Old School View Post
Faceplam another 24 inch monitor WTF ASUS.

Need bigger sizes 24 inch is just way to small.
If it was 27" or more then you'd probably say the resolution is too low :P

For triple or dual setups 24 is still pretty common. 27 is becoming more affordable but you lose pixel density at that size. (and need a massive desk)

It's all a trade off between panel technology, refresh rate, price, resolution, freesync/gsync....

It's pretty smart from a business sense to be covering the most common gaming display resolution (Steam hardware survey) and I'd dare say 24" still outsell the 27s although I have no proof at all to back that up..Quote

15-04-2016, 22:27:36

King of Old Old School
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimma47 View Post
If it was 27" or more then you'd probably say the resolution is too low :P

For triple or dual setups 24 is still pretty common. 27 is becoming more affordable but you lose pixel density at that size. (and need a massive desk)

It's all a trade off between panel technology, refresh rate, price, resolution, freesync/gsync....

It's pretty smart from a business sense to be covering the most common gaming display resolution (Steam hardware survey) and I'd dare say 24" still outsell the 27s although I have no proof at all to back that up..
If it was 27 inch or higher yes the resolution needs to be higherQuote

16-04-2016, 05:29:38

TPC
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Old School View Post
If it was 27 inch or higher yes the resolution needs to be higher
but in that form factor we have monitors already?Quote
Reply
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