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Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will not support DirectX 12 at launch

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will not support DirectX 12 at launch

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will not support DirectX 12 at launch

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will not support DirectX 12 at launch

 

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will not support DirectX 12 at launch, with full support planned for early September. 

This means that at launch the game will only work in DirectX 11 mode, meaning that the game will lack support for Asynchronous compute and is expected to offer lower performance than the game's future DirectX 12 version when it launches on the week of September 5th. 

 

   Contrary to our previous announcement, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, which is shipping on August 23rd, will unfortunately not support DirectX 12 at launch.

We have some extra work and optimizations to do for DX12, and we need more time to ensure we deliver a compelling experience. Our teams are working hard to complete the final push required here though, and we expect to release DX12 support on the week of September 5th! 

  Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will not support DirectX 12 at launch 

 

Below are the official PC system requirements for Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, though sadly these specifications do not specify the game settings these specifications will run the game at or the expected framerate.  

The game will require a CPU with a minimum of 4 CPU threads and will require a Windows 7 or newer 64-bit OS with 8GB of system memory. This game will have both DirectX 11 and DirectX 12 version, though the DirectX 12 version is likely to deliver greater gaming performance, especially on modern hardware. 

 

Minimum: 
OS: Windows 7.1SP1 or above (64-bit Operating System Required) 
CPU: Intel Core i3-2100 or AMD equivalent 
RAM: 8 GB 
Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB) or NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 (2GB) 
HDD/SSD: 45 GB 

Recommended: 
OS: Windows 10 64-bit 
CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K or AMD FX 8350 Wraith 
RAM: 16 GB 
Graphics: AMD Radeon RX 480 - 1920 x 1080 or NVIDIA GTX 970 - 1920 x 1080 
HDD/SSD: 55GB (Including DLC) 

 

On Steam, preloading will begin on Friday, August 19th at 09:00 PDT / 12:00 EDT / 17:00 BST / 18:00 CEST. Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will release on August 23rd. 

 

You can join the discussion on Deus Ex: Mankind Divided lacking DX12 support at launch on the OC3D Forums.

 

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Most Recent Comments

17-08-2016, 17:11:55

AngryGoldfish
This is getting a bit silly now. Are we ever going to see this much-hyped DX12 come into fulfillment? I thought Deus Ex was going to be the first thoroughbred DX12 game that fully realises its potential. I found out I was wrong about that last week back when someone clarified here the game would support both API's. But the absence of DX12 at launch is just embarrassing for both AMD and Microsoft. AMD banked on a very slow moving API. Anyone who bought Fiji are still waiting for their cards to fully shine. With Microsoft butchering games on Windows, the future doesn't look as bright as the initial leaks surrounding DX12 specifications suggested. By the time DX12 games actually come out and are patched to a point of acceptability and playability, Volta will be out and fully support async compute. Everyone has been saying that AMD are playing it smart, but it's becoming more and more apparent to me that nVidia is the one that knows exactly what is going on.

I could be wrong.Quote

17-08-2016, 17:18:44

Legacy-ZA
My concern is; the amount of data that new games use, it is insane and the SSD prices are still ludicrous when compared against HDDs.Quote

19-08-2016, 00:16:10

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngryGoldfish View Post
This is getting a bit silly now. Are we ever going to see this much-hyped DX12 come into fulfillment? I thought Deus Ex was going to be the first thoroughbred DX12 game that fully realises its potential. I found out I was wrong about that last week back when someone clarified here the game would support both API's. But the absence of DX12 at launch is just embarrassing for both AMD and Microsoft. AMD banked on a very slow moving API. Anyone who bought Fiji are still waiting for their cards to fully shine. With Microsoft butchering games on Windows, the future doesn't look as bright as the initial leaks surrounding DX12 specifications suggested. By the time DX12 games actually come out and are patched to a point of acceptability and playability, Volta will be out and fully support async compute. Everyone has been saying that AMD are playing it smart, but it's becoming more and more apparent to me that nVidia is the one that knows exactly what is going on.

I could be wrong.
DX12 has been around for one year. It doesn't magically mean on release every game will use it. API adoption is slow for many reasons. In this case, very very mature and well known DX11 API. Many devs are familiar with it and know the tricks to get more out of it. In addition, drivers are very mature. Don't forget it takes time to build engine's that support this. Then you have to develop the game after that. It's just a long process. The only game that uses it well is AotS. Because it was built with DX12 first. But still it's an early API and it hasn't reachedits full potentialQuote

19-08-2016, 11:43:19

AngryGoldfish
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
DX12 has been around for one year. It doesn't magically mean on release every game will use it. API adoption is slow for many reasons. In this case, very very mature and well known DX11 API. Many devs are familiar with it and know the tricks to get more out of it. In addition, drivers are very mature. Don't forget it takes time to build engine's that support this. Then you have to develop the game after that. It's just a long process. The only game that uses it well is AotS. Because it was built with DX12 first. But still it's an early API and it hasn't reachedits full potential
That's all true, and therein lies the point.

The Fury X was touted as the next generation of hardware for the next generation of API's. That was a folly, clearly, as Pascal now beats it in every respect. Which is exactly what even nVidia fanboys predicted would happen. The Fury line has completely dropped off, even with the introduction of its intended API. The 290X was also better suited to Mantle/DX12, but it remained relevant for over three years despite it having such heavy competition. I'm not suggesting that nVidia are inherently more future proof because the 780ti can easily be beaten by a 290 nowadays, due in part to the additional memory and up-to-date support from drivers. But the Fury X was a disappointment. The limitation of the memory, the ridiculous pricing scheme that was unfortunately necessary, the comparatively inefficient design, the AIO cooler, the limited aftermarket GPU's (Gigabyte didn't even advertise their G1 Gaming Fury; it just came out quietly). It all added up to be a tepid release that promised so much more.

To have bought a Fury X in the hope of seeing it shine in DX12 has ultimately become a failed concept. If what you say is true, and it obviously is, banking on DX12 as a slowly maturing API in a silicon war is a senseless decision. You're buying fresh ingredients to pair with a wine that has yet to mature. By the time the wine has matured, your cheese has grown mold. It makes no sense. That's my opinion. Anyone who still owns a Fury X has a solid card, but that's about the extent of it.Quote

19-08-2016, 18:56:50

NeverBackDown
Pascal simply beats it because it's simply just faster. Taking 980SLI performance into one card would be faster than a 980ti or FX any day of the week. So it's not that the FX is crap, it's simply not enough horsepower to be in the same category. In addition to that, FX gains huge when using DX12, but still, it's simply to much power it's competing against. Solo cards is another story where the fX is fighting off every card that was in the previous generation. A 1070 would be it's closest competitor, but even then it's still simply more powerful it is basically a TX.

Also to point out. I think you are riding the Fury line too quickly. It's still very fast for today's games and as more games move to dx12 and people hold onto those card's, they just stay more relevant for longer

I don't any person bought a Fury X for the hopes of DX12. If they did, that's all on them. You never buy a GPU because of an API. I bought a Fury X yes, but my intent was getting the most I couldfor my money, and I did. Dx12 was the icing on the cake for me as I think it was for most peopleQuote
Reply
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