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Nvidia creates new Cataclysm Liquid Solver for the Unreal Engine 4

Nvidia creates new Cataclysm Liquid Solver for the Unreal Engine 4

Nvidia creates new Cataclysm Liquid Solver for the Unreal Engine 4

Nvidia creates new Cataclysm Liquid Solver for the Unreal Engine 4

 

Nvidia has released their new Cataclysm Liquid Solver for the Unreal Engine 4, presenting some amazing looking fluid physics. 

This new Cataclysm liquid physics uses a custom FLIP (Fluid-Implicit Particle) based GPU solver alongside the Unreal Engine 4's GPU particles with Distant Field Collisions, which allows Cataclysm to simulate up to two million liquid particles at once. 

This new technique only works in Unreal Engine 4 and can be downloaded right now on GitHub, though anyone who is looking to access it will need a UE developer account and a Nvidia GameWorks Developer Account linked to their GitHub account. 

 

   The Cataclysm Liquid Solver can simulate more than a million liquid particles in real time.

It uses a custom FLIP based GPU solver at its core. The custom solver is combined with Unreal Engine 4's GPU Particles with Distance Field Collisions to allow artists to flood environments with physically simulated liquid.

 

 

Right now we do not know when Nvidia will officially announce their Cataclysm Liquid Solver, though it certainly looks impressive.

 

You can join the discussion on Nvidia's Cataclysm Liquid Solver on the OC3D Forums.  

  

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Most Recent Comments

25-07-2016, 17:58:52

NeverBackDown
It's pretty good i'd say, but seems a little to exaggerated imo. If the goal was for more of a simulation, the water should have taken the buildings down or at least gone though them and out windows, etc. Then that would be freaking impressive.
That said, as it stands, it would still work pretty well with games and probably suits it perfectly.Quote

25-07-2016, 18:48:19

AbyssNova
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
It's pretty good i'd say, but seems a little to exaggerated imo. If the goak was for more of a simulation, the water should have taken the buildings down or at least gone though them and out windows, etc. Then that would be freaking impressive.
That said, as it stands, it would still work pretty well with games and probably suits it perfectly.
Indeed, but remember it's just announced so to make it a bit simpler or to release it faster they used big vertical blocks to simulate buildings, maybe on later information Nvidia will share something with real, functional buildings.

PD: is it me or the water looks more like blue oil than actual water?Quote

25-07-2016, 20:16:30

Wraith
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
It's pretty good i'd say, but seems a little to exaggerated imo. If the goak was for more of a simulation, the water should have taken the buildings down or at least gone though them and out windows, etc. Then that would be freaking impressive.
That said, as it stands, it would still work pretty well with games and probably suits it perfectly.
The idea is to simulate liquid created with particles and how they react to solid objects, I know from past experience using Blender Cycles and the fluid dynamics rendering that it takes an absolute age to render a 1,000,000 particle scene anything upto 24 hours, for nVidia to pull this off in real time is impressive. The only thing I'd really like to know is what spec system they used, the mathematics involved in this task even with an engine as good as UE4 is rediculous.Quote

25-07-2016, 20:25:34

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wraith View Post
The idea is to simulate liquid created with particles and how they react to solid objects, I know from past experience using Blender Cycles and the fluid dynamics rendering that it takes an absolute age to render a 1,000,000 particle scene anything upto 24 hours, for nVidia to pull this off in real time is impressive. The only thing I'd really like to know is what spec system they used, the mathematics involved in this task even with an engine as good as UE4 is rediculous.
Sony and Havok did this on a PS4, a million particle scene. No it wasn't water but it's still impressive for ps hardware. You should expect PC hardware to perform better as it is here, it's about time tbh. Software needs to catch up to hardware, as we already have photorealistic capabilties in real time with modern GPUs. Which is equally as impressive.Quote

26-07-2016, 05:23:12

SuB
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Sony and Havok did this on a PS4, a million particle scene. No it wasn't water but it's still impressive for ps hardware. You should expect PC hardware to perform better as it is here, it's about time tbh. Software needs to catch up to hardware, as we already have photorealistic capabilties in real time with modern GPUs. Which is equally as impressive.
Sony did fluids on PS3, though I can't remember the particle counts.

PhysX cards were monsters at this and only ever got about 50% efficient because of the software side of it, pretty sure they were better at it than an actual GPU is now. nvidia's implementation is good, but it's still not as efficient at it as the dedicated physx chips were.Quote
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