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The Xbox One S uses an SoC made on TSMC's 16nm FinFET processing node

The Xbox One S uses an SoC made on TSMC's 16nm FinFET processing node

Microsoft's Xbox One S will come with a factory overclock

The Xbox One S uses an SoC made on TSMC's 16nm FinFET processing node

 

The Xbox One S uses an SoC made on TSMC's 16nm FinFET processing node, meaning that AMD has built GPUs on both TSMC's 16nm and GlobalFoundries 14nm processes. 

Building this new SoC on a newer processing node allows Microsoft/AMD to manufacture an SoC that should be both consumes less power and has reduced thermal output over the larger 28nm chip used in the original Xbox One.

These power savings are what allows Microsoft to build the Xbox One S in a much smaller form factor, as the new Xbox One S requires a smaller cooler design and a lower wattage power supply.  

 

The Xbox One S uses an SoC made on TSMC's 16nm FinFET processing node

 

Microsoft's Xbox One S comes with a factory overclock of around 7% on the GPU core, potentially preventing performance dips in some games. 

On the CPU side, the Xbox One S delivers the same 1.75GHz clock speeds as the original Xbox One, but the Xbox One S has a 7% GPU overclock, upping the GPU clock speeds from 853MHz to 914MHz and upping the ESRAM bandwidth from 219GB/s to 204GB/s. 

Below you can see a table comparing the specifications. 

 

 Xbox One SXbox One
CPU Clock8 cores at 1.75GHz8 cores at 1.75GHz
GPU 12 GCN Compute Units12GCN Compute Units
GPU Clock914MHz853MHz
Compute Performance1.4TFLOPS1.31TFLOPS
ESRAM Bandwidth219GB/s204GB/s

 

These performance boosts will be minimal when compared to the original Xbox One, though the differences will be noticeable in some games, especially if they use dynamic resolutions or in games which frequently dip below a set framerate cap. 

All in all the Xbox One S offers a smaller size, lower power consumption and slightly increased performance, making the new console preferable to its older version, but does not offer enough to convince any Xbox One users to upgrade.

 

You can join the discussion on the Xbox One using a TSMC 16nm SoC on the OC3D Forums

 

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