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Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000

Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000

Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000

Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000

 

Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000 by selling fraudulent game keys and  facilitating a "black market economy".

G2A is a grey market key reseller, which allows game keys to be sold through the service in an eBay-like way. While this may not seem like a bad thing at first glance it does facilitate and profit of the selling of stolen game keys. 

To put it bluntly a lot of the largest sellers on G2A are criminals, using stolen credit card information to purchase game keys in bulk and then sell them on G2A at half the retail price. Chargebacks from these stolen credit cards leave key sellers and game developers without any earnings from these stolen game keys, bringing some game distributors to the brink of financial collapse.  

 

        websites like G2A are facilitating a fraud-fueled economy where key resellers are being hit with tons         of stolen credit card transactions and these websites are now growing rapidly due to low pricing of game keys

  Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000  

After a long discussion with G2A Tinybuild was able to get some sales figures for their own games on the G2A platform, accounting for almost $200,000 worth of sales and $450,000 worth of lost earning had these keys been sold at their full retail price from a verified reseller.  

When they asked G2A where the sold keys came from they simply passed off the blame to their own partnered resellers, stating that they sold the keys on G2A at under the retail game price. G2A then recommended that Tinybuild sold game keys on G2A directly and sold their keys there at under their retail price on Steam and other legitimate websites. 

G2A said that they would provide no compensation and that they won't do anything to help unless they undersell their own products in the G2A storefront. Below is a statement from G2A

 

    So the issue you have pointed to is related to keys you have already sold. They are your partners that have sold the keys on G2A, which they purchased directly from you. If anything this should give you an idea on the reach that G2A has, instead of your partners selling here you could do that directly.

I can tell you that no compensation will be given. If you suspect that these codes were all chargebacks aka fraud/stolen credit card purchases I would be happy to look into that however I will say this requires TinyBuild to want to work with G2A. Both in that you need to revoke the keys you will be claiming as stolen from the players who now own them and supply myself with the codes you suspect being a part of this. We will check to see if that is the case but I doubt that codes with such large numbers would be that way.

Honestly I think you will be surprised in that it is not fraud, but your resale partners doing what they do best, selling keys. They just happen to be selling them on G2A. It is also worth pointing out that we do not take a share of these prices, our part comes from the kickback our payment providers.

 

Tinybuild claims G2A has scammed them out of $450,000

 

Tinybuild could try to combat these fraudulent game key sellers by blacklisting suspected game keys, but in reality, this only serves to harm the consumers who purchase them and not the black market key sellers themselves. 

G2A is a website that supports the practice of black market key reselling and in doing so supports credit card fraud and ensures that game developers do not make earnings from a large portion of total game sales.

Right now gamers will be seeing G2A sponsor a lot of gaming events and advocated by a lot of Twitch Streamers due to their affiliate program, but G2A are not friends of game developers and should be avoided whenever possible by consumers. 

 

You can join the discussion on G2A scamming Tinybuild out of $450,000 on the OC3D Forums.    

 

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Most Recent Comments

21-06-2016, 06:22:54

SeekaX
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
Read more on G2A's shady practices.
I don't know why this made me laugh, probably because it could be a headline in the Sun.
Ah well, i avoid keysellers, not being able to get a refund is annoying and considering the prices you know that there's always something shady going on. A good game deserves the full price.Quote

21-06-2016, 06:59:43

barnsley
shock horror company known for dodgy practices is most likely dodgy.Quote

21-06-2016, 09:59:19

Greenback
I disagree with this
"Tinybuild could try to combat these fraudulent game key sellers by blacklisting suspected game keys, but in reality, this only serves to harm the consumers who purchase them and not the black market key sellers themselves."

If they block those keys then the person who bought them would need to go to G2A for a refund, which wouldn't happen, this would discourage that person from purchasing keys from sites like this in future.

secondly unless these stolen keys are sold by Tinybuild directly, then surely the chargeback goes to the partner/reseller who sold them and not Tinybuild as they should have already been paid by the partner/resellerQuote

21-06-2016, 10:46:49

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenback View Post
I disagree with this
"Tinybuild could try to combat these fraudulent game key sellers by blacklisting suspected game keys, but in reality, this only serves to harm the consumers who purchase them and not the black market key sellers themselves."

If they block those keys then the person who bought them would need to go to G2A for a refund, which wouldn't happen, this would discourage that person from purchasing keys from sites like this in future.

secondly unless these stolen keys are sold by Tinybuild directly, then surely the chargeback goes to the partner/reseller who sold them and not Tinybuild as they should have already been paid by the partner/reseller
A lot of these keys were taken from the developer directly when they sold them on their own webstore. This store had to be closed down due to frequent chargebacks.

Disabling these keys could only be applied to known fraudulent keys, which takes a while for the developer to fully investigate. Most disable keys will be for users who own the game for longer than G2A's refund policy will allow, meaning that a lot of users will not get a refund.

I remember Ubisoft doing this for Far Cry 4 keys a few years ago and it was a PR disaster for Ubisoft. Lots of angry fans.Quote

21-06-2016, 11:02:40

shambles1980
i see..
One company upset that they dont have as many sales as they would like.
and another company saying.. You sold these keys to a re seller..

You would imagine that a re seller would need to be verified before being supplied with any meaningful amounts of cd keys.
So i find it hard to imagine that so many of these keys are reportedly bought en-mass and then charge backs are applied.
if they are then there is something seriously wrong with the way they verify the buyers..

Also it should be a simple matter to have a set prefix in a cd key.. IE
bac12-798xx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxx to bac19-999xx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxx
and sell them in sequential order.. they do it with money so i dont see why cd keys couldnt be ordered like that..

then if some one buys 1000 keys on a stolen card. they can easily just dissable all keys in the batch that was sold to the fraudster.
people would complain to the g2a web page who would remove that reseller.

yes some end users would be hit by this. but generally this would be quick enough that g2a were still able to refund them.
if this practice had been in place from the start that it.Quote
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