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VRM components may overheat and fail on EVGA GTX 1070 or 1080 GPUs with ACX coolers

VRM components may overheat and fail on EVGA GTX 1070 or 1080 GPUs with ACX coolers

VRM components may overheat and fail on EVGA GTX 1070 or 1080 GPUs with ACX coolers

VRM components may overheat and fail on EVGA GTX 1070 or 1080 GPUs with ACX coolers

GTX 1070 and 1080 GPUs from EVGA have been facing some thermal issues when using the companies own ACX cooler design, with Tom's Hardware pointing out that the GPUs VRM temperatures could get as high as 1-7-114 degrees celsius when under full load.   
 
These high temperatures can be seen as concerning for EVGA users, though it is worth noting that EVGA's chosen MOSFETs are designed to be able to run at these temperatures without any issues. 
 
Even so, EVGA understands the concerns of users and reviewers and has decided to provide GTX 1070/1080 users with optional thermal pads upon request, which will allow both the VRM and VRAM areas of the GPU to both the GPU backplate and the ACX cooler itself, significantly reducing the temperature of these areas of their GPUs.
 
These optional thermal pads will be provided free of charge by EVGA, though concerned users will be able to source their own thermal pads and enhance the cooling of their GPU themselves. Below is an image showcasing an EVGA ACX cooled GPU with their new cooler enhancements.  

  

VRM components may overheat and fail on EVGA GTX 1070 or 1080 GPUs with ACX coolers   

 

There have been reports of EVGA GTX 1070/1080 GPUs failing under load due to MOSFET failure, which is due to the VRM area of the GPU overheating. 

This type of failure can be prevented using EVGA's thermal pad mod, though it is worth noting that these failures were likely a combination of EVGA's thermal design oversights and poor case ventilation, resulting in overly hot VRMs and a catastrophic failure of MOSFETs.  

Below is an image of an EVGA GTX 1070 FTW, which failed under load while playing Shadow Warrior 2, resulting in the users PC shutting down and the GPU producing smoke and sparks at the time of failure. 

 


VRM components may overheat and fail on EVGA GTX 1070 or 1080 GPUs with ACX coolers

 

Right now it seems that catastrophic failures like shown above are rare, though we would nonetheless recommend that EVGA 10-series GPU users with ACX coolers upgrade their GPU using EVGA's free thermal pads. There is no reason why EVGA users shouldn't modify their GPU to run cooler, especially when it can prevent component failure and extend the life of your GPU. 

In the meantime concerned EVGA 1080/70 owners should make sure that their case has plenty of airflow directed at the rear of their GPU and should request some thermal pads from EVGA as soon as they can. You can apply for some thermal pads from EVGA here.  

   

You can join the discussion on EVGA's ACX cooler design oversights on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

31-10-2016, 18:54:30

Dicehunter
I got in contact with EVGA CS and there is a good way to test if you're ACX cooled GPU is affected.

Go here - http://www.evga.com/support/guestregister.asp

And enter your serial number, If the ship date is before the end of August then you "may" have an affected GPU, If it's after you should be safe as it was only a small batch that was affected.Quote

31-10-2016, 19:22:22

Kushiro
Cant say I have ever been a big fan of using the backplate to cool those

I prefer the backplate to not feel like its going to melt away haha. Seriously though, when is EVGA going to get some proper cooling on there....Quote

31-10-2016, 19:25:38

AlienALX
Those VRMs are bloody tiny !Quote

01-11-2016, 17:39:20

3DJF
Sooooo. Emailed EVGA on this as i have a registered product that falls into circle of affected products. Don't get me wrong i'm glad i got a reply but really not happy with the response.

Maybe someone more familiar with the details can enlighten me:
"The test used in the referenced review from Toms Hardware (Germany) is running under Furmark, an extreme usage case, as most overclockers know. We believe this is a good approach to have some idea about the graphics card limit, and the thermal performance under the worst case scenario. EVGA has performed a similar qualification test during the design process, at a higher ambient temperature (30C in chamber) with a thermal coupler probe directly contacting the key components and after the Toms Hardware (Germany) review, we have retested this again. The results in both tests show the temperature of PWM and memory is within the spec tolerance under the same stress test, and is working as originally designed with no issues."
This was the first para of the response, what caught my eye was the ref to the Furmark being an "extreme worst case"....ummm i thought the EVGA precisionxOC software uses furmark to stress the GPU in the manual run for finding card limits? Are they trying to say a specific furmark stress test isn't good but the one they supply to test the card is fine??
I'm not a fan of stock emails at best but whoever wrote this should consider doing something else...Quote

01-11-2016, 18:16:14

Kilbane
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3DJF View Post
Sooooo. Emailed EVGA on this as i have a registered product that falls into circle of affected products. Don't get me wrong i'm glad i got a reply but really not happy with the response.

Maybe someone more familiar with the details can enlighten me:
"The test used in the referenced review from Toms Hardware (Germany) is running under Furmark, an extreme usage case, as most overclockers know. We believe this is a good approach to have some idea about the graphics card limit, and the thermal performance under the worst case scenario. EVGA has performed a similar qualification test during the design process, at a higher ambient temperature (30C in chamber) with a thermal coupler probe directly contacting the key components and after the Toms Hardware (Germany) review, we have retested this again. The results in both tests show the temperature of PWM and memory is within the spec tolerance under the same stress test, and is working as originally designed with no issues."
This was the first para of the response, what caught my eye was the ref to the Furmark being an "extreme worst case"....ummm i thought the EVGA precisionxOC software uses furmark to stress the GPU in the manual run for finding card limits? Are they trying to say a specific furmark stress test isn't good but the one they supply to test the card is fine??
I'm not a fan of stock emails at best but whoever wrote this should consider doing something else...
FurMark IS an extreme use scenario. It will use 100% of the GPU core 100% of the time with no limitation to frame rates. It is designed to stress the card as you said. There is no real world usage that will ever match something like that.

So what they are saying is, don't panic too much. Only if you are deliberately pushing your card to the limits and stressing it do you have to have a major concern. Chances are the cards will bee 100% safe in real world applications such as gaming.Quote
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