'

GlobalFoundries' 7nm process is set to make Intel's process leadership evaporate

When will Intel start releasing 10nm products?

GlobalFoundries' 7nm process  is set to make Intel's process leadership evaporate

GlobalFoundries' 7nm process is set to make Intel's process leadership evaporate

For the past number of years, Intel has been one of the world leaders when it comes to silicon manufacturing/process technology. Intel was the first to introduce FinFET technology, beating most competing foundries to the punch by several years, though in recent times the company has found it increasingly difficult to push their next-generation 10nm node to market. 

A lot of Intel's recent difficulties can be attributed to physics.  Decreasing node sizes introduces unique problems that only become more complex as transistors get smaller and products become more logic dense. These issues have slowed down the evolution of process technology, leading many to explore the use of new materials of r future processors. 

Intel's upcoming 10nm process has been delayed several times, giving competing foundries an ideal opportunity to catch up with Intel, with Globalfoundries making a bold jump from 14nm to 7nm, bringing the company into striking range of Intel's 10nm process. 

The delay of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) technology to market has slowed down the production of next-generation nodes significantly, with the technology being slated to take the world to the limits of silicon, with Samsung planning to go all the way down to 3nm. Globalfoundries plans to integrate EUV technology into their 7nm LP (Leading performance) node, but initial offerings will not be making use of the new technology. 

Globalfoundries upcoming 7nm node is already set to be the home for AMD's upcoming Zen2 and Navi CPU/GPU architectures, promising a 2x increase in transistor density and a 40% increase in performance or a 55% decrease in power consumption. This makes the jump from 14nm to 7nm a transformative leap for GlobalFoundries, with semiwiki noting that "Intel's 10nm process to GF's 7nm process they are more similar than they are different". It appears that Intel's process leadership is starting to disappear, which is great news for AMD's future processors. 

  

GlobalFoundries' 7nm process  is set to make Intel's process leadership evaporate

(GlobalFoundries 14nm vs 7nm)


What remains to be seen is how well both Intel's 10nm and GobalFoundries' 7nm processes perform, thought the sad fact of the matter is that we will likely never see any directly comparable products on each node, making it difficult to make any conclusive comparisons. Regardless, it is clear that the gap between Intel and their competitors is set to get narrower moving forward, creating a much more competitive foundry market moving forward.   

With 7nm GlobalFoundries will be utilising several technologies that they acquired from IBM back in 2015, with 7nm being a huge turning point for the company. GlobalFoundries' original 14nm process suffered from a lot of problems, forcing them to license Samsung's 14nm process to remain competitive, the move to 7nm will bring the company back into the forefront of the foundry industry using their own technology. Let's just hope that 7nm can come to market without any major issues. 

The Foundry market is set to become more competitive than ever before, especially given the viability of modern EUV technology in the coming years. 

You can join the discussion on GlobalFoundries' 7nm process on the OC3D Forums

«Prev 1 2 Next»

Most Recent Comments

22-12-2017, 12:46:27

NeverBackDown
Intel will still have a lead. It'll be a smaller one but it's still ahead. 7nm GloFlo is still about equal to 10nm Intel. Once Intel hit 7nm they'll get a little bit further ahead.Quote

22-12-2017, 15:17:00

RobM
One can only shrink something so much, I think the next tech is not far away and we will be on bio computers soonQuote

22-12-2017, 15:17:10

Silpir
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Intel will still have a lead. It'll be a smaller one but it's still ahead. 7nm GloFlo is still about equal to 10nm Intel. Once Intel hit 7nm they'll get a little bit further ahead.
This makes no sense. Their 10nm isn't even out yet, so when do you think they will get 7nm out?Quote

22-12-2017, 16:25:24

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Intel will still have a lead. It'll be a smaller one but it's still ahead. 7nm GloFlo is still about equal to 10nm Intel. Once Intel hit 7nm they'll get a little bit further ahead.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silpir View Post
This makes no sense. Their 10nm isn't even out yet, so when do you think they will get 7nm out?
I haven't even heard Intel say a word about anything beyond 10nm. They have invested in EUV equipment, but it will be a while before they are using to create and sell products.

At this rate, Intel 10nm and Gloflo 7nm will be shipping within a quarter or two of each other. Not much point talking about Intel 7nm when even Intel hasn't spoken about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobM View Post
One can only shrink something so much, I think the next tech is not far away and we will be on bio computers soon
There is more to process technology than size and transistor densities, so there will still be improvements to be made, be it with material design or adjustments to transistor structure.

While FinFET does serve us well now, GAAFET (Gate All Around-FET) will be the next big thing, where the gate will have 360 coverage around the channel region. Right now FinFETs (Or Tri-Gate transistors) only cover it from three sides.Quote

22-12-2017, 16:34:48

Radioman
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Intel will still have a lead. It'll be a smaller one but it's still ahead. 7nm GloFlo is still about equal to 10nm Intel. Once Intel hit 7nm they'll get a little bit further ahead.
Intel's 10nm Process resembles a Dumpster Fire. They have produced large scale chips on on 2 different nodes and their performance shows zero improvement over their current 14nm+ Manufacturing Node. 10nm+ samples of the BB Sized "U" and "Y" chips used in laptops are expected by the end of 2018. It will be interesting to see what they do. But even if they do yield a marginal increase in performance there is nothing to say such an increase will be prevalent when the production line is redirected to full scale microprocessors.

The problems Intel has been experiencing with its 10nm node has claimed some real victims. Intel's Cannon Lake line of Desktop Microprocessors, which was promised to us in 2016, has been canceled. Intel will be heading straight to Icelake in early 2019.

AMD on the other hand has maintained that the 7nm Version of Epyc code named Rome will be released in the 2nd Half of 2018 with Desktop Processors following on in 2019.

Reports from within AMD and Global Foundries as well as industry experts who follow microprocessor development like Charlie Demerjian have stated the GloFo 7nm "is in Good Shape".

Here is a video of a talk given by Tom Faure explaining the various aspects of the masks used in GloFo 7nm Process.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UxDGH8uslMQuote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.