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LG, Samsung and Motorola state that they do not slow down phones with older batteries

Battery related performance downgrades seem exclusive to Apple

LG, Samsung and Motorola state that they do not slow down phones with older batteries

LG, Samsung and Motorola state that they do not slow down phones with older batteries

Over the past few weeks, Apple has been under constant assault from consumers, angry at the revelation that Apple has been slowing down their older devices to resole battery-related design issues. This information has fueled claims that Apple's devices are created with "planned obsolescence" in mind to feed an upgrade culture on a semi-annual basis.    

Now, competing smartphone makers like LG, Samsung and HTC have weighed in on the matter, confirming that they do not slow down their devices over time. LG stated that they "Never have, [and] never will!", saying that "We care what our customers think". HTC made a similar announcement stating that slowing down their devices as batteries age "is not something we do".
 
Samsung has made the longest statement on this matter, saying that they do not reduce the CPU performance of their devices through its lifecycle and that they take the extended battery life of their devices seriously. This statement should be especially true after the disastrous release of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7. 

    Product quality has been and will always be Samsung Mobile's top priority. We ensure extended battery life of Samsung mobile devices through multi-layer safety measures, which include software algorithms that govern the battery charging current and charging duration. We do not reduce CPU performance through software updates over the lifecycles of the phone.

LG, Samsung and Motorola state that they do not slow down phones with older batteries  

All of these phone manufacturers are far from perfect, and it would be untrue to say that Apple's "slowing down" of iPhones didn't serve a purpose outside of tempting their users to upgrade to newer models.

Apple's performance reducing updates were designed to prevent random shutdown issues that were starting to plague iPhone 6 devices, with many shutting down with battery's sitting at around 40% capacity. These updates allowed affected phones to remain usable at lower charges, though Apple's mistake was not telling customers about the change or that a battery replacement would address the issue. 

Apple has apologised for these battery related issues and plans to release updates in early 2018 that will inform consumers about the health of their device's battery. Apple plans to reduce the cost of battery replacements in late January from $79 to $29 for iPhone 6 and newer devices. 

You can join the discussion about LG, Samsung and HTC's claims that they do not slow down their mobile phones over time on the OC3D Forums.  

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Most Recent Comments

30-12-2017, 15:29:55

Digikid
No of course not. Android is so fragmented and unsecure and it slows down by itself. Quote

30-12-2017, 16:30:35

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digikid View Post
No of course not. Android is so fragmented and unsecure and it slows down by itself.
Well that's totally not true. Have you even used stock andriod? Because anything else is basically the equal to Lenevo/Asus/Dell/HP/etc using there own special version of Windows that adds bloatware. Stock Andriod is by far superior. Android is even encrypted out of the box as is Apple.Quote

31-12-2017, 03:21:24

ByteMyAscii
My opinion, and not one most news sites are keen to jump onto is that Apple's mistake was lack of transparency only.

When I have raised the possibility of a phone actually shutting down instead, nobody has been able to come and tell me that was was a better outcome than it slowing.

It is there actual evidence that the slowing wasn't actually necessary
I haven't seen that claim made yet, perhaps someone else has ?

What I see is apple apologising for the lack of transparency, but not for doing it in the first place.
Which is one of two possibilities.
Either as the news would like to have us believe that this was entirely profit motivated, and apple don't give a damn.
Or that phones could could actually fail to work correctly, and apple were right.

I have seen no evidence to disprove the latter yet.Quote
Reply
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