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Tesla issues voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S vehicles

Corroding bolts due to winter salts

Tesla issues voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S vehicles

Tesla issues voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S vehicles

Tesla pre-April 2016 Model S models have a design flaw, one which will affect a minimal number of cars but nonetheless proves troublesome for a large number of drivers. This issue is estimated o effect 0.02% of vehicles in the US, mostly thanks to the specific weather and environmental conditions that are required to get this issue to present itself. 

123,000 Model S vehicles are affected by this voluntary recall, with the dangers being limited to cars used in cold climates, especially when calcium and magnesium-based road salts are frequently used. These conditions can cause the power steering bolts on pre-April 2016 Tesla Model S vehicles to corrode and weaken, with failure resulting in the loss of power steering. Without power steering, Tesla users will need to be a lot more forceful when steering their cars, making the vehicle a lot more challenging to drive at low speeds or when parking.    

While this issue is specific to select environmental conditions, Tesla is willing to replace the steering bolts of all affected vehicles, just in case these vehicles are ever used in affected areas across the globe. This incident has resulted in Tesla's largest recall to date, though the issue does not present any immediate danger to most Tesla users.  

  

     We have observed excessive corrosion in the power steering bolts, though only in very cold climates, particularly those that frequently use calcium or magnesium road salts, rather than sodium chloride (table salt). Nonetheless, Tesla plans to replace all early Model S power steering bolts in all climates worldwide to account for the possibility that the vehicle may later be used in a highly corrosive environment

If the bolts fail, the driver is still able to steer the car, but increased force is required due to loss or reduction of power assist. This primarily makes the car harder to drive at low speeds and for parallel parking, but does not materially affect control at high speed, where only small steering wheel force is needed.

 

Tesla issues voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S vehicles  

Tesla's stock has already seen a considerable decrease in price this month after a deadly Model X crash occurred in California, where some suspect that the vehicle's Autopilot mode was engaged at the time of the accident. 

You can join the discussion on Tesla's voluntary recall of 123,000 Model S vehicles on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

31-03-2018, 07:54:24

AlienALX
Ouch.... I'd still rock one though.Quote

31-03-2018, 08:01:04

d3rrial
Isn't this the exact issue that MKBHD reported?Quote

31-03-2018, 08:06:58

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
Ouch.... I'd still rock one though.
Not that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things, at worst people will lose power steering. Not exactly a "these electric cars are setting themselves on fire" kinda issues, though it is nonetheless an annoying issue.

Recalls like this are common within the industry, most people forget how complex these machines are.Quote

31-03-2018, 08:19:15

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
Not that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things, at worst people will lose power steering. Not exactly a "these electric cars are setting themselves on fire" kinda issues, though it is nonetheless an annoying issue.

Recalls like this are common within the industry, most people forget how complex these machines are.
Every car I ever owned had a recall. Some of them were mental tbh. My ex wife's father bought her a Ford Taurus. IIRC it was a 1993? or 92?. Any way, they were known to blow head gaskets. Even though it was 13 years old when she bought it used they still covered a skim and new head gasket.

My Tiburon needed new seat belts (but I didn't bother because I had 4 point harnesses) and the Chevy Malibu we had (Vauxhall something) had an issue where the wires running through the firewall were getting pinched so the whole dashboard needed to be rewired..

So yeah, compared to head gasket cost (having the engine skimmed and so on) and the Chevy fail (it took them nearly a week to fix that, but they had to 'cause it would have been a lemon otherwise) I would imagine this really isn't that bad.

Very few cars ever have no recalls at all, and in the USA it is very easy to look them up and to find out if they have been done. My tibby had an issue with the recoil spring in the seat belts but yeah, didn't apply to me 'cause I had already ripped them out and chucked them in the nearest bin Quote
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