AMD, Phison, and Micron demo a Ryzen 7000 CPU an 10,000 MB/s PCIe 5.0 SSD

Faster SSDs are on the horizon, and this demo drive is just the beginning

AMD, Phison, and Micron demo a Ryzen 7000 CPU an 10,000 MB/s PCIe 5.0 SSD

Phison demos a 10 GB/s SSD with a Ryzen 7000 series processor and Micron's 232-layer 3D NAND

During this year's Flash Memory Summit, Phison has showcased a new SSD that's based on the company's PCIe 5.0 E26 SSD controller. This experimental SSD was tested with Micron's latest 232-layer 3D NAND (more info here) and with an AMD Ryzen 7000 series processor on an AM5 motherboard. Using this hardware configuration, Phison was able to showcase sequential read/write speed of over 10,000 MB/s.

Phison's experimental SSD uses the standard 2280 (22mm x 80mm) M.2 SSD form factor, and Tom's Hardware has confirmed that this SSD test model uses unfinished SSD firmware and does not use Micron's 232-layer 3D NAND to its fullest potential. Firmware tweaks should allow this SSD to achieve higher performance levels, with Phison already claiming that their E26 SSD controller can deliver speeds of up to 12 GB/s. 

Currently, the NAND flash in Phison's test SSD runs its NAND at 1600 MT/s, but the NAND can support much higher speeds of 2000 MT/s. This change alone should enable a healthy performance increase for Phison, enabling higher levels of performance for users. Phison aims to deliver SSDs that can offer users 12/11 GBps sequential read/write speeds with their E26 SSD controller, and 1.5/2 million random read/write IOPS for consumer-level SSDs.

AMD, Phison, and Micron demo a Ryzen 7000 CPU an 10,000 MB/s PCIe 5.0 SSD

Earlier this year, Phison, AMD, and Micron teamed up to bring PCIe 5.0 storage to the consumer PC market faster. This collaboration will allow early PCIe 5.0 SSDs to become available later this year. These SSD launches will likely coincide with the launch of AMD's Ryzen 7000 series CPUs and their PCIe 5.0 compatible AM5 motherboard platforms.

One noteworthy aspect of this SSD test is that Phison's PCIe 5.0 SSD does not feature a heatsink. This implies that PCIe 5.0 SSDs will be usable without an attached heatsink, though heavy sustained loads will likely result in PCIe 5.0 SSDs overheating, like many of today's high-end PCIe 4.0 SSDs.

Phison has previously stated that heatsinks are required to deliver peak performance from their SSDs, as SSD controllers can get hot under heavy loads, and the compact M.2 form factor gives SSDs little space for heat dissipation. 

AMD, Phison, and Micron demo a Ryzen 7000 CPU an 10,000 MB/s PCIe 5.0 SSD

You can join the discussion on Phison using an AMD Ryzen 7000 series CPU to demo a PCIe 5.0 SSD on the OC3D Forums.  

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Most Recent Comments

03-08-2022, 21:44:06

meuvoy
We've reached a point where this has just became very stupid... Why does any end-user need 12gbps SSD speeds? If it weren't for newer games that will probably require higher than PCI-E 3.0 speeds for use with direct storage then PCIE4 speeds would already be excessive. In fact most PC users that only use their PC for web browsing and office applications are perfectly happy with SATA SSD speeds.Quote

03-08-2022, 22:41:16

Dawelio
Quote:
Originally Posted by meuvoy View Post
We've reached a point where this has just became very stupid... Why does any end-user need 12gbps SSD speeds? If it weren't for newer games that will probably require higher than PCI-E 3.0 speeds for use with direct storage then PCIE4 speeds would already be excessive. In fact most PC users that only use their PC for web browsing and office applications are perfectly happy with SATA SSD speeds.
This is purely for marketing reasons, as you said yourself, the average user today barely exceeds gen 3 speeds.Quote

04-08-2022, 11:11:57

dazbobaby
Wow that motherboard looks old. Red, cluttered and cheap LED's.
Is it meant to be ironic?Quote

04-08-2022, 14:29:54

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by dazbobaby View Post
Wow that motherboard looks old. Red, cluttered and cheap LED's.
Is it meant to be ironic?
Prototype/testing boards don't need to look fancyQuote

09-08-2022, 12:29:08

Avet
Quote:
Originally Posted by meuvoy View Post
We've reached a point where this has just became very stupid... Why does any end-user need 12gbps SSD speeds? If it weren't for newer games that will probably require higher than PCI-E 3.0 speeds for use with direct storage then PCIE4 speeds would already be excessive. In fact most PC users that only use their PC for web browsing and office applications are perfectly happy with SATA SSD speeds.
Intel's 905p is still by far the best SSD that you can have for pretty much any workload. P5800X was so fast that it broke kernels, and software. Sadly Intel doesn't make them anymore. 10K on seq performance doesn't mean a thing to anyone except a data center server.

Actually it is more software than hardware problem. SSDs need to pretend to be Hard Drives for Operating Systems and Apps. OSs and Apps still don't know how to work with flash memory. For them SSD is just a super fast spinning rust drive.Quote
Reply
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