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Google will integrate an ad-blocker into Chrome on February 15th

With this fix the problems posed by excessive ad-blocking?

Google plans to add their own add-blocker to Chrome on February 15th

Google will integrate an ad-blocker into Chrome on February 15th

Back in June, Google pledged to develop and integrate "ad-filtering" technology into their Chrome browser, a system that is designed to remove ads from websites that do not meet Google guidelines, which adhere to the standards set by the Coalition for better ads.

Unlike the "scorched earth" approach that is taken by traditional ad-blockers, Google's system will remove ads from websites that feature things like Pop-up ads, auto-play video ads with sound, countdown ads and large sticky ads. This system will take out the Internet's most annoying ads while allowing "good" ads to remain visible. Google's ad-blocker, in theory, offers a "best of both worlds" solution for both website owners and internet users alike.   

Google plans to integrate this system into Chrome on February 15th, blacklisting and whitelisting websites based on the standards set by the coalition for better ads.  Google will then start removing all ads from sites that have a "failing" status in Google's Ad Experience report for over 30 days. Below is Google's full Blog post regarding the change. 

    An update on Better Ads

Yesterday, the Coalition for Better Ads announced the "Better Ads Experience Program." This Program provides guidelines for companies like Google on how they can use the Better Ads Standards to help improve users' experience with ads on the web.

In June, we announced Chrome's plans to support the Better Ads Standards in early 2018. Violations of the Standards are reported to sites via the Ad Experience Report, and site owners can submit their site for re-review once the violations have been fixed. Starting on February 15, in line with the Coalition's guidelines, Chrome will remove all ads from sites that have a "failing" status in the Ad Experience Report for more than 30 days. All of this information can be found in the Ad Experience Report Help Center, and our product forums are available to help address any questions or feedback.

We look forward to continuing to work with industry bodies to improve the user experience for everyone.

 
 
Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018

  

Below are some of the standards that are set by the Coalition for Better Ads, showcasing what falls below the standards set by the organisation. Google's Chrome browser is currently the world's most widely used internet browser, which means that websites will need to respond to Chrome's changes to maintain their current ad revenue.   

Google's ad-blocker functions in a way that will allow a website to remain monetised and encourages a high standard for online advertisements. Traditional ad-blockers offer no sites the ability to re-monetise using ads, making Google's solution an ideal way to promote the use of "good" ads while still maintaining the ad-supported model for online content. 

 

Google plans to add their own add-blocker to Chrome on February 15th

(Ads defined as unacceptable by the Coalition for Better Ads)  
Google plans to add their own add-blocker to Chrome on February 15th  

The only problem with Google's plans is the potential for the company to tweak the system for its benefit, given the fact that the company makes most of its revenue from online advertisements. This ad-filtering" feature system gives Google the power to crack down on competitors, presenting a conflict of interest. 

Allying themselves with the Coalition For Better Ads gives this system a lot more credibility, using standards set outside of the company as the basis for their ad-blocking system. Even so, this new feature does present Google with a potential tool that can be exploited to hammer down their competition. 

You can join the discussion on Google's plans to integrate an ad-blocker into Chrome on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

20-12-2017, 07:24:37

AlienALX
I hope this works. I was over my mother's house the other day on Facebook on my phone and four times got sponsored ads on Facebook with pictures of penises on them. Literally actual penises. So obviously Facebook are not vetting their supposedly "sponsored ads" which tbh I find quite disgusting. Who uses Facebook more than any one else? kids under the age of 13.

As for the use of online ads? I don't pay almost £50 a month for my internet only for it to come smothered in ads. This capitalist BS is honestly starting to wind me right up. And I am sick of them telling me that (when I complain) "We will try and send ads better suited to you !".

F**K OFF, I don't want to see any of your ads. I have never seen a single advert, in all of my life, that has made me think "Ooo, I think I will buy that !". Ever. In fact, adverts only annoy me and make me not want to buy that product.Quote

20-12-2017, 08:26:31

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
As for the use of online ads? I don't pay almost £50 a month for my internet only for it to come smothered in ads. This capitalist BS is honestly starting to wind me right up. And I am sick of them telling me that (when I complain) "We will try and send ads better suited to you !".

F**K OFF, I don't want to see any of your ads. I have never seen a single advert, in all of my life, that has made me think "Ooo, I think I will buy that !". Ever. In fact, adverts only annoy me and make me not want to buy that product.
Just going to point out that the ads don't fund your ISP (unless they are somehow injecting their own). Ads are what pay for online content and it is what keeps things running smoothly without everything being part of a subscription service or every website asking for donations.

There isn't really an alternative to the ad-supported internet model, donations and paywall would be impossible for most and end up costing end-users more to access the same content.Quote

20-12-2017, 10:10:07

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
Just going to point out that the ads don't fund your ISP (unless they are somehow injecting their own). Ads are what pay for online content and it is what keeps things running smoothly without everything being part of a subscription service or every website asking for donations.

There isn't really an alternative to the ad-supported internet model, donations and paywall would be impossible for most and end up costing end-users more to access the same content.
Oh yeah I can dig that. What's odd is when I go on Facebook on the PC I see barely any ads at all. Mind you, I do have three ad blockers on it lmao.

Problem for me is forced ads. You go to a web site to read something and it tries to force you into disabling your blocker. Now that's all well and good, but these days there are a hundred websites out there all with the same thing on. So that just pushes me away from reading content.

I have also noticed in myself as I get older that I turn to Youtube more and more these days. It's bone lazy but it's easier.Quote

20-12-2017, 10:49:20

RobM
I dont see fb ads ty add blockers
I turn off add blocking for certain sites where I enjoy content, the rest can take a running jumpQuote

20-12-2017, 10:55:46

Darkdayzzz
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
Oh yeah I can dig that. What's odd is when I go on Facebook on the PC I see barely any ads at all. Mind you, I do have three ad blockers on it lmao.

Problem for me is forced ads. You go to a web site to read something and it tries to force you into disabling your blocker. Now that's all well and good, but these days there are a hundred websites out there all with the same thing on. So that just pushes me away from reading content.

I have also noticed in myself as I get older that I turn to Youtube more and more these days. It's bone lazy but it's easier.
You literally just answered your own problem with the ads on the phone vs the PC. You have adblockers installed on the pc and not the phone, you COULD use an adblock browser for your phone (they do work, I have used one or two occasionally but I am almost always near a pc for my browsing usage).

But yeah the adblock browser is really nice on the phone Quote
Reply
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