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Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Revealed: SODIMM farewell

Say goodbye to the SODIMM form factor and hello to more connectivity options

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Revealed: SODIMM farewell

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Revealed: SODIMM farewell

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has officially released their Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, bringing with it a new form factor, new features and stronger CPU and graphics hardware. 

This compute module arrives six months after the Raspberry Pi 4, with the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 offering users a starting price of $25 and 32 total variants to meet the needs of all customers. Pricing-wise, all Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 products will offer more value than their predecessors, offering users an enhanced feature set and 1GB RAM options with the same pricing as the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3. 

For a fully kitted out Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4, users will get 8GB of RAM, 32GB of eMMC storage and WiFi support for $90. 

Smaller than ever
 
The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 brings with it a new form factor, removing the devices drop-in compatibility with devices which used older Compute Modules. Older Compute Modules used the JEDEC DDR2 SODIMM form factor, connecting the device to I/O through an edge connector. Now, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 uses two high-density perpendicular connectors for power and I/O. 

Thanks to this change, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 has become much smaller than its predecessor, which is great news for any product which will make use of the board. 

Specifications

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 uses the same quad-core BCM2711 processor as the Raspberry Pi 4, offering users a significant performance boost over Raspberry Pi's prior Compute Modules. This processor offers users faster CPU cores, faster media encoding/decoding, new I/O options and faster DRAM with increased densities. 

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 has 1GB, 2GB, 4GB and 8GB RAM configurations, can be purchased with or without WiFi support and ship with optional eMMC storage onboard (8GB, 16GB or 32GB). 

One major add-on for the Raspberry Pi 4 is PCIe 2.0 support, allowing users to attach PCIe devices to the Raspberry Pi 4 Compute Board. This is just a single PCIe 2.0 lane, giving the Compute Module 4 a data transfer rate of around 500MB/s. 

Raspberry Pi 4 Compute Modules Specifications: 

- 1.5GHz quad-core 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU
- VideoCore VI graphics, supporting OpenGL ES 3.x
- 4Kp60 hardware decode of H.265 (HEVC) video
- 1080p60 hardware decode, and 1080p30 hardware encode of H.264 (AVC) video
- Dual HDMI interfaces, at resolutions up to 4K
- Single-lane PCI Express 2.0 interface
- Dual MIPI DSI display, and dual MIPI CSI-2 camera interfaces
- 1GB, 2GB, 4GB or 8GB LPDDR4-3200 SDRAM
- Optional 8GB, 16GB or 32GB eMMC Flash storage
- Optional 2.4GHz and 5GHz IEEE 802.11b/g/n/ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 5.0
- Gigabit Ethernet PHY with IEEE 1588 support
- 28 GPIO pins, with up to 6 × UART, 6 × I2C and 5 × SPI

 

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Revealed: SODIMM farewell  

To help users get started with the Compute Module 4 I/O board, Raspberry Pi has released a new I/O board. This new board allows users of the Raspberry Pi 4 to utilise the full interfacing capabilities of the Compute Module 4.  

The Raspberry Pi 4 Compute Module 4 I/O board will cost $35, making the complete Raspberry Pi 4 Compute Module package cost as little as $60 

 

The IO board provides:

- Two full-size HDMI ports
- Gigabit Ethernet jack
- Two USB 2.0 ports
- MicroSD card socket (only for use with Lite, no-eMMC Compute Module 4 variants)
- PCI Express Gen 2 x1 socket
- HAT footprint with 40-pin GPIO connector and PoE header
- 12V input via barrel jack (supports up to 26V if PCIe unused)
- Camera and display FPC connectors
- Real-time clock with battery backup

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Revealed: SODIMM farewell  
While the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 features an onboard antenna, some users would benefit from using an external antenna. This is where Raspberry Pi's Compute Module 4 Antenna Kit comes in. 

This kill will be especially useful to those who will be placing their Compute Modules within a metal case, which is common within industrial applications. 

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 Revealed: SODIMM farewell  

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 is Raspberry Pi's most powerful to date, delivering users new features, a smaller form factor and the same compelling pricing levels as before for basic models. 

You can join the discussion on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

19-10-2020, 05:22:10

tgrech
Perfect, they've nailed price and config options. We've got a project going through at the moment ready to get ported straight to these for an initial roll out in select venues.

More generally on the hobbyist side, maybe portable Pi gaming has just taken a big step towards a desirable future.Quote

20-10-2020, 19:09:52

Digikid
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
Perfect, they've nailed price and config options. We've got a project going through at the moment ready to get ported straight to these for an initial roll out in select venues.

More generally on the hobbyist side, maybe portable Pi gaming has just taken a big step towards a desirable future.

Raspberry Pi Gameboy comes to mind.....Quote

20-10-2020, 21:27:53

hmmblah
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digikid View Post
Raspberry Pi Gameboy comes to mind.....
I have one that looks like an original gameboy and uses a Pi Zero W. It's great for NES/SNES/SEGA, but lacks the power for anything more. More options are definitely welcome and it will be awesome to see what people come up with.Quote

21-10-2020, 07:25:40

tgrech
Yeah the little more emulation orientated kits are great, but yeah often so far the form factor and power has been a big trade off vs each other, Eben Upton has been talking a lot recently of wanting a Commodore/AtariST/BBC Micro/ect style fresh indie/hobbyist games market on the more modern Pi hardware, maybe as an intro for kids into development too much in the same way those PCs wereQuote

22-10-2020, 13:41:33

Jaxel
What makes this different from a normal Pi4?Quote
Reply
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