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Google shows off Project Ara for the first time.

Project Ara

Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon

Google shows off Project Ara for the first time.

 

When the "Phonebloks" concept was announced in September of last year it was met with equal praise and ridicule, with many praising the concept for trying to address the throwaway nature of the design of the many mobile phones on the market today and others claiming that such a device could be created affordably or in a reasonable size/form factor. This concept is what eventually became Google's Project Ara, a fully modular smartphone.

In essence the concept is simple, create a mobile phone which can have its parts easily replaced or upgraded when the user desires, so that merely a single component is thrown away instead of an entire phone and that users will be able to in theory create a phone that meets their own specifications. Now members of The Verge were shown a functional prototype of the product and for the first time have seen the device boot up, though not successfully.

Here Paul Eremenko, the head of Project Ara showing Google's prototype of Project Ara at Google I/O 2014. Though the phone failed to fully load, Audience cheered on merely seeing the Android boot screen.

 

 

Below is a video from The Verge where the Project Ara development team discuss their product.

 

 

Google had taken the Phonebloks concept and created Project Ara, the world first modular phone, and will soon be releasing devkits to people and companies interested in creating modules for this phone. With a consumer version of the product expected to be coming sometime in late 2015.

 

 Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon  Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon  

Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon  Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon  Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon  Google to ship Dev Kits of Project Ara soon  

 

Project Ara will run on Android, though Android will need to change in order to accommodate Ara. Google developers said that it will be a true "stress test for the OS to see if it is flexible enough to be able to facilitate the complexity of Ara.

Paul Eremenko, technical lead of Project Ara said that modules could be easily shared and switched. One example could be that a family buys an high end camera module and it could be switched to whichever family member required a good camera, perhaps a member that is going on a holiday and would like to share the experience when they return or a secondary battery could be inserted when the first dies, another handy feature when traveling.

Project Ara should be first available in fall 2015 and it will change the way that many people look at mobile phones. Eremenko ended by saying that "this will be hard, but we're going to do it together," lets hope Project Ara can reach its ambitious goals within the next year.

 

Join the discussion on Project Ara on the OC3D Forums.

 

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Most Recent Comments

16-10-2014, 08:21:32

MadShadow
So you are limited in terms of the size of modules and how many of them you can have, due to the frame. Its a bit dissapointing, but I guess it would be too difficult without any limitations of the frame.Quote

16-10-2014, 08:31:17

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadShadow View Post
So you are limited in terms of the size of modules and how many of them you can have, due to the frame. Its a bit dissapointing, but I guess it would be too difficult without any limitations of the frame.
Yes but any module can have any function, for example all of the rear modules could be power. Due to form factor restrictions there is a limit to the amount of modules, nut I don't see that as a negative.Quote

16-10-2014, 08:36:21

MadShadow
Quote:
Originally Posted by Watsyerproblem View Post
Yes but any module can have any function, for example all of the rear modules could be power. Due to form factor restrictions there is a limit to the amount of modules, but I don't see that as a negative.
Im sure that some modules will only be of a certain size. Imagine if you want more larger modules than smaller modules, but due to the frame, you need to do something (or nothing) with the smaller slots.Quote

16-10-2014, 08:37:44

SPS
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadShadow View Post
So you are limited in terms of the size of modules and how many of them you can have, due to the frame. Its a bit dissapointing, but I guess it would be too difficult without any limitations of the frame.
I think what they could possibly achieve is pretty amazing, I don't see how being limited to a form factor is disappointing? This applies to every device.Quote

16-10-2014, 08:40:42

MadShadow
Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS View Post
I think what they could possibly achieve is pretty amazing, I don't see how being limited to a form factor is disappointing? This applies to every device.
Its still really impressive, but its quite different from the original "phonebloks" concept. Its not exactly fully modular as you can only have a certain amount of modules of a certain sizeQuote
Reply
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