Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review

The Build and Cooling

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

The Build and Cooling

The case doesn't come with a PSU, but Riotoro were kind enough to furnish us with one of their excellent Enigma 850W units, so it would have been rude not to use it. 

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

As you can see, with a minimal build it's really easy to bring everything together, and we've no reason to believe that things would get any harder with a full build.  As previously mentioned, the CR1280 can take GPUs up to 400mm and CPU coolers up to 180mm in height, which is plenty enough for anyone.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

Ample cable management space and cable tie points, combined with plentiful and well placed grommeted management holes also easy to keep things neat and tidy round the back 

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

And so to cooling, with 180mm of headroom on offer you shouldn't have any problem fitting even the largest of tower coolers in here.  Our Havik 120 looks positively lost.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

Air cooling...Pffft who cares about air cooling.  What we want to know is what sort of radage can we fit in here?  Well up front theres 145mm of space before you hit the edge of the motherboard.  As usual you will have to take into account the distance to the cables coming through the management holes, and the length of your GPU, but the possibilities are there.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

In the image below we've fitted an average depth 240mm rad.  As you can see, there's actually stacks of room on offer even if you wanted to go thicker and with push pull.  The CR1280 will also take 280mm rads up front.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

Up in the roof there's 65mm of space on offer.  As there's no real off set to speak of, this means you're very much limited to a 40mm thick rad when combined with standard 25mm thick fans.  Now, don't go thinking this is overly restrictive, as it's not, for starters there are quite a few 360mm AIOs on the market that would fit in here just fine, not to mention the rad selection for custom loops. 

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

OK, so this XSPC rad is pushing the envelope somewhat, and there's no way we can get any fans on it.  We have though shown that it's possible to get something massive into the roof if you're adventurous.  There are though certain caveats.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

Just take a look at how much space there is to play with at the back end.  Two coats of paint and that rad wouldn't have fitted.  Oh, and we did need to remove the rear fan to get it in.  OK, so we could have re attached it, but we'd then have some fun routing the tubing around it.  Still, it can be done.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

 

Things are equally as tight at the front.  As you can see, if you were going to put your end tanks this end you'd have to be imaginative in navigating the uppermost of the front 120mm fans.  Personally, when we see stuff like this, it gets our modding juices flowing and we take it as a challenge.

Riotoro CR1280 Prism Review  

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