Xigmatek Gigas Review

Testing and Conclusion

 Xigmatek Gigas

 

Testing and Conclusion

Although the Gigas is a pretty "no frills" case don't go thinking it's low quality.  It's not.  OK so the Aluminium might not be the thickest in the world, but it's sturdy finished to a very high standard both inside and out, with no marks or blemishes to be see.  The top panel fits perfectly into it's slight recess, giving the impression of precision engineering having taken place.  The inside of the case is clean and tidy with no rough edges or burrs to be found anywhere (and I have found these on cases that can be considered to be high end).  The power and reset buttons are quite firm and "clicky" in use but this is a very minor thing.

4x120mm 800rpm fans on push pull front to back (albeit non filtered) give good cross case airflow (perhaps because they are unfiltered).  In use the case is surprisingly quiet, I had expected the fans to transmit vibrations and for the Aluminium case to "chime" to some extent.  I'm pleased to report there was no evidence of this. 

Styling wise the Gigas is a bit of a tough one to call.  It's perhaps a little too big and bold to be used as an HTPC in your living room.  Actually let me re phrase that.  If you're a bloke living on your own then there's no problem at all, but I strongly suspect that there's no way in Gods Green earth that a Girl friend or wife will let this anywhere near her pot plants and chintz sofa.  Perhaps in the Black finish if you're really lucky but I suspect not.  On a more objective note, the use of a single piece of Aluminium wrapping all the away around the sides and front of the case does lend it a certain class and the fine fit of the top panel does nothing to detract from the sleek appearance.  The large perforated X on the front however gives a totally different message altogether.

The Gigas is not able to handle full size ATX, and although it will take Micro ATX and Mini ITX, for a small form factor it's not exactly small.  Having the internals laid out on two levels presents significant problems if you want to change hardware.  For example if you want to change a CPU cooler you pretty much have to take everything else out, and I mean everything.

It's a bit hard to know what to make of the Gigas.  It's a nice case and well put together, no doubt about that, but it's not really clear what it's for.  I think this is maybe because it's trying to be two things at the same time.  Ok lets try to look at this in a more positive way.  On one hand It's an HTPC with better than average storage options and Pseudo sleek looks, although perhaps not sleek enough to slip past the missus.  On the other hand it's a gaming rig for those of you that want something that looks a bit different to all the rectangular ATX towers out there, You're willing to compromise a little with the form factor but still want to be able to lob in a biggish CPU cooler, a large PSU and perhaps a couple of big GPUs.

At £118 the Gigas isn't exactly cheap.  If all your looking for is a decent case for your gaming rig then there are better options out there for sure.  However if you're looking for a case that offers that something a little bit different in the looks department as well as a degree of flexibility of use then you might just have to pay the premium.  For the price though I would have expected some cable management options, some fan filters and perhaps better access.

 

  

Thanks to Xigmatek for the Gigas on test today, you can discuss your thoughts in our forums.

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Most Recent Comments

20-02-2012, 06:19:16

sheroo
Good review. It does look as if its got a bit of an identity crisis. I love SFF cases but this one doesn't quite float my boat. Quote

20-02-2012, 11:46:16

dipzy
Abit to big and abit ugly for my liking, for a tenner or so more, id rather have the Lian Li PC-V354BQuote

20-02-2012, 13:29:44

Mr. Strawberry
really think they should of put the motherboard tray on the top

with at completely blank top panel it is just asking for a window to be cut in it so you can have a view of the hardware from the top but sadly you can't :/Quote
Reply
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