AMD Raven Ridge Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G Review

Introduction and Technical Specifications

AMD Raven Ridge Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G Review

Introduction

While AMD's Ryzen series of CPUs were highly successful, it is undeniable that they were unable to cover the whole PC market, leaving behind the lucrative integrated graphics market while the company focused on their high-end ambitions. 

Summit Ridge was an extremely versatile product, offering an 8-core single-die design which covered a range of markets. The desktop market used a single-die design with 4-8 core offerings, creating their Ryzen 3-7 series of products, with dual-die 8-16 core products with their Threadripper series of high-end desktop (HEDT) processors and four-die CPUs with up to 32 cores and 64 threads with their enterprise-grade EPYC series of server CPUs.

AMD has bet heavily on versatile product designs, allowing them to compete with the development budget or Intel with a mass-produced core design, with the only flaw with this approach being the lack of products with integrated graphics.  

In the OEM desktop market, it is thought that around a third of systems ship without a dedicated GPU, leaving a massive gap in the market where Ryzen couldn't tap into at launch. This market segment calls for another versatile CPU design, which AMD has now delivered with Raven Ridge. 

Raven Ridge covers both the mobile CPU market and consumer desktop segments, cutting down on unneeded aspects of high-end Ryzen to create a product that was more suitable for low-power mobile and cost-effective desktop systems. Raven Ridge is a Ryzen CPU design with a single CCX, none of the interconnects for multi-chip modules and a Vega graphics component, creating AMD's most advanced APU to date. 

 

Technical Specifications

When compared to its Summit Ridge/Ryzen 1000 series counterparts, the Raven Ridge/ Ryzen 2000G series offers increased clock speeds, a move to a single-CCX design and support for increase memory clock speeds. This is discounting Raven Ridge's most notable addition, which is the inclusion of integrated graphics, which means that Ryzen system can now be built without a dedicated GPU. 

The inclusion of an integrated GPU is a great thing to see given today's GPU pricing, where demand for cryptocurrencies has increased raised the price of GPUs significantly.  

When looking at AMD's pricing for Raven Ridge, it seems like AMD is giving their users a free iGPU with this generation, with MSRPs that are the same as their last-generation counterparts, with no increase in MSRP or TDP. From a value standpoint, it is hard to argue with AMD's pricing here, especially given this product's increased clock speeds. 

The move to Raven Ridge does not come without sacrifices, like the decrease in Raven Ridge's L3 cache size, which will affect specific workloads, as well as Raven Ridge's lower number of PCIe lanes for graphics. Both Summit Ridge and Raven Ridge processors offer 4 PCIe lanes for M.2 storage and four PCIe lanes for chipset connectivity, with Summit Ridge offering 16 extra lanes for PCIe connectivity (for dedicated graphics) while Raven Ridge only provides eight PCIe lanes for graphics. 

These downgrades are not huge concerns for most users, as eight PCIe lanes are enough for most modern graphics cards. Anyone that needs more than eight PCIe lanes will likely be using a dedicated GPU, which means that standard Ryzen is a better product for them, and anyone using a beefy enough GPU to complain about having only eight PCIe lanes should be investing in a higher end CPU, simple. 

 Ryzen 3
1200
Ryzen 3 2200GRyzen 3
1300X
Ryzen 5
1400
Ryzen 5 2400GRyzen 5 1500X
CPU SocketAM4AM4AM4AM4AM4AM4
Manufacturing Process14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm
Cores/Threads4/44/44/44/84/84/8
CCX2+24+02+22+24+02+2
CPU Base Clock3.1GHz3.5GHz3.5GHz3.2GHz3.6GHz3.5GHz
CPU Boost Clock3.4GHz3.7GHz3.7GHz3.4GHz3.9GHz3.7GHz
L2 Cache2MB2MB2MB2MB2MB2MB
L3 Cache8MB4MB8MB8MB4MB16MB
Memory Support (Dual Channel)2667MHz2933MHz2667MHz2667MHz2933MHz2667MHz
TDP65W65W65W65W65W65W
iGPUN/AVegaN/AN/AVegaN/A
iGPU Stream Processors-512--704-
iGPU Clock Speed-up to 1100MHz--up to 1250MHz-
PCIe Lanes for Dedicated Graphics16x8x16x16x8x16x
Included HeatsinkWraith StealthWraith
Stealth
Wraith StealthWraith StealthWraith
Stealth
Wraith Spire
(No LED)
MSRP (US) $99$99$124 $149$169$174
MSRP (UK)£89£89£109£139£149£149

 

 

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Most Recent Comments

12-02-2018, 10:00:18

RobM
no video Tom?Quote

12-02-2018, 10:54:09

Frode B Nilsen
What is the test bench setup?

HDMI 2.0? I got a HDMI only 4K TV. The 2200G will be the cheapest solution by far, that supports hdmi 2.0. The only native alternative is 1030/rx550, which is almost alone the cost of the 2200G.Quote

12-02-2018, 11:45:49

tinytomlogan
Video now in the reviewQuote

12-02-2018, 12:01:14

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobM View Post
no video Tom?
The Video is now in the review.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frode B Nilsen View Post
What is the test bench setup?

HDMI 2.0? I got a HDMI only 4K TV. The 2200G will be the cheapest solution by far, that supports hdmi 2.0. The only native alternative is 1030/rx550, which is almost alone the cost of the 2200G.
Test bench setup is on page 2 at the bottom.

HDMI 2.0 will be down to what your motherboard supports, as some AM4 motherboards only have HDMI 1.4 as far as I am aware.Quote

12-02-2018, 12:49:51

Frode B Nilsen
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
The Video is now in the review.



Test bench setup is on page 2 at the bottom.

HDMI 2.0 will be down to what your motherboard supports, as some AM4 motherboards only have HDMI 1.4 as far as I am aware.
Thanks. The test bench probably has a typo, that confused me on the MB:

"AMD Ryzen 3 2200G & Ryzen 5 2400G
ASUS Prime Z370-PLUS
G.Skill Flare X 3200MHz memory
Corsair RM1000i
Corsair MP500 512GB
Corsair H110i GT
Windows 10"

That probably should be x370-PLUS, Z370-PLUS? Anyway, i missed it down there, so thanks for answering.

As for what motherboards supports, the specs are a mess:

X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM

"-1 x HDMI™ 2.0 port, supports a maximum resolution of [email protected] (1)
-1 x DisplayPort, supports a maximum resolution of [email protected] (2)

(1) Only support when using a 7th Gen A-series/ Athlon™ processors
(2) Maximum shared memory of 2048 MB"


What does that mean?

GA-AX370-Gaming K7

" Integrated Graphics Processor:
1. 1 x HDMI port, supporting a maximum resolution of [email protected] Hz
* Support for HDMI 1.4 version.
2. Maximum shared memory of 2 GB

* Actual support may vary by CPU."


These specs can actually mean a lot of different things. Like being written for the Athlon CPUs available at MB launch or like for the K7, that they maybe but not clearly only support HDMI 1.4. It is clearly CPU dependent, and Athlons only support HDMI 1.4, so what is the story with the MSI board? The HDMI on the MSI is after all only available using an last gen Athlon?

No body seems to know, but a lot of people are opinionated. I would really appreciate it, if you could try it out.

As for HDMI 1.4, max refresh rate for 2D is 24Hz.Quote
Reply
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