Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit

 

Placing more and more powerful PC hardware into smaller and smaller cases have been something which has continued to grow in popularity over recent years, especially as CPUs have became more and more efficient.

ASUS' Republic of Gamers Impact series of motherboards has always been at the pinnacle of motherboard technology in such a small form factor, providing the same quality of power circuitry and overclocking prowess as most of it's larger counterparts and still contains all required motherboard features while maintaining it's small form factor.   

  

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  

 

Taking this motherboard out of the box we can see that this motherboard has toned down on the red like the other members of the Republic of Gamers Maximus VIII series of motherboard, taking a more stealthy black and grey aesthetic with only a few red highlights. 

Looking at this motherboard we can see that this motherboard features everything that you need out of a Skylake motherboard, even if you are looking to get a decent overclock on your CPU. We can see at the top that this motherboard has great power circuitry for an MITX motherboard, taking up a lot of space on a vertically mounted daughterboard on the top edge of the motherboard. 

One other thing that this motherboard supports is full sized DDR4 DIMMS, which means that users will be able to use high speed DDR4 memory on this motherboard, rather than slower power efficient mobile DDR4 memory. A lot of space could have been saved by using smaller SODIMM DDR4 but it is great to see ASUS resist the temptation. 

 

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  

 

With space being such a limiting factor for MITX motherboards ASUS had to get a little creative when building the audio section of this motherboard, building it on it's own isolated PCB which is vertically attached to the motherboard. The sound section of this motherboard is removable if the user wishes, though I only see a user removing it is they wish to use a full cover motherboard water block. 

The only thing that this motherboard lacks is an M.2 slot, though with space being at such a premium I wonder is such a large amount of space could be dedicated to an M.2 device alone given how feature packed this motherboard already is. 

Please note that this does not mean that this motherboard does not support NVMe devices, as this motherboard does have a U.2 port, so you will be able to use an NVMe storage device, just not an M.2 version. 

 

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  

 

On the rear IO we can see that this space will be used for a lot of features that we would typically find on the motherboard, like a power switch, reset switch and even a post code screen. 

For Video outs we only have a single HDMI port here, but in the majority of cases you will not need any more than this, especially since most if not all users will be using this motherboard with a GPU. 

 

Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  Asus ROG Maximus VIII Impact - RushKit  

 

Conclusion

When looking at this motherboard I have been amazed by how much ASUS have managed to fit into a motherboard of this size, offering everything that a small form factor PC gamer would ever need, offering a large number of USB 3.0 and 3.1 ports and beefy enough circuitry for some heavy overclocking. 

The only thing that this motherboard lacks is an M.2 slot, which is going to be a point of contention for some of you, though there is a U.2 slot for those who want to use an ultra fast SSD with this motherboard. 

To put things simply this motherboard is the best that you can really do on a motherboard of this size, it offers high quality audio components, overclocking ready VRMs and even a post code reader and power/reset switches.

Trying to do more in this form factor will comes with some major sacrifices, like using laptop sized DDR4 DIMMS or lowering the all round quality of what ASUS has built here. The ASUS Maximus VIII Impact is one of the best looking MITX motherboards ASUS has ever produced, which makes us look forward to reviewing this motherboard intensely. Will we get our 6700K to 4.8GHz again? 

You can join the discussion on ASUS's ROG VIII Impact on the OC3D Forums.  

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Most Recent Comments

09-10-2015, 18:17:34

Dicehunter
For future reference Tom it's "Nit-Chii-Con" Quote

10-10-2015, 08:26:06

AlienALX
The only issue I have with small hardware (after recently building an ITX based pocket rig) is the prices. Surely less should not equal more.

The last one of these was £200 or more, a complete con. Surely using half the materials and a sixth of the slots costs less to make?Quote

10-10-2015, 09:01:53

JR23
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
The only issue I have with small hardware (after recently building an ITX based pocket rig) is the prices. Surely less should not equal more.

The last one of these was £200 or more, a complete con. Surely using half the materials and a sixth of the slots costs less to make?
The fact there is less is only true to an extent. Increasing the density of anything increases the cost significantly and that is essentially what all tech progression is based on. It's no surprise smaller products which can achieve the same results are more expensive, people will pay a premium for that. The amount of features on an Impact is insane and they really need to be. If your trying to make something genuinely small and portable and there is only one expansion slot everything else needs to be on the board itself, audio, networking, storage and the obvious power delivery. Then even things you don't think about at first like fan controllers. You can't really appreciate how much stuff the Impact has on it until you've done a mad build with one and afterall ROG is ASUS' flagship so you wouldn't expect compromises in any of these areas.

You have to consider them as a package. It's like buying an epic overclocking mATX board, and a sound card, and a fan controller, and some form of network adapter then having all of that packaged into a single piece a fraction of the size. I agree it isn't worth it for everyone, if you aren't going to appreciate everything it does then it is very expensive however it definitely isn't a con.

JRQuote

10-10-2015, 10:12:55

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR23 View Post
The fact there is less is only true to an extent. Increasing the density of anything increases the cost significantly and that is essentially what all tech progression is based on. It's no surprise smaller products which can achieve the same results are more expensive, people will pay a premium for that. The amount of features on an Impact is insane and they really need to be. If your trying to make something genuinely small and portable and there is only one expansion slot everything else needs to be on the board itself, audio, networking, storage and the obvious power delivery. Then even things you don't think about at first like fan controllers. You can't really appreciate how much stuff the Impact has on it until you've done a mad build with one and afterall ROG is ASUS' flagship so you wouldn't expect compromises in any of these areas.

You have to consider them as a package. It's like buying an epic overclocking mATX board, and a sound card, and a fan controller, and some form of network adapter then having all of that packaged into a single piece a fraction of the size. I agree it isn't worth it for everyone, if you aren't going to appreciate everything it does then it is very expensive however it definitely isn't a con.

JR
I was speaking purely logically. If a board uses 8 phases, for example, then it uses 8 phases. If, let's say, a ITX board does use 8 phases (and is therefore a high end board) then it uses the same as an ATX board (even though some MSI boards have in excess of 16 phases which is electrically pointless).

However, then let's talk about the rest. PCB - nearly a quarter of the amount. Physical PCIE slots - one. I doubt there's any need for me to continue this as you've probably understood my point by now.

Surely, then, by using far less materials (and possibly far less royalties for things like PCIE slots, if they're handled similarly to USB slots) the cost of manufacturing should be far less.

Yes, it's quite difficult to design but then what motherboard isn't?

However, all of that aside my main point is that ITX hardware is over priced. If it wasn't then maybe more people would use it.Quote

10-10-2015, 10:51:09

JR23
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
Yes, it's quite difficult to design but then what motherboard isn't?
Exactly, it's difficult to design and it will sell in much smaller numbers than any other motherboard hence it makes sense that it's more expensive. Also it's not like a Hero where they will remove some stuff, get the cost down and sell it as a Ranger. Everything about it is very speficic, very time intensive to develop and not particularly popular in the grand scheme of things. Cost of manufacture isn't the only factor in the price of anything, if it's more profitable for ASUS and still competitive in its little sector of the market then GG.

JRQuote
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