ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview

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ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview

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The Crosshair VIII Extreme takes a leaf out of the Dark Hero book by running with passive cooling everywhere. We know that passively cooled Chipsets are a key of the X570S, but having proved it's doable on the regular X570 chipset it's no surprise this flagship ASUS motherboard has gone in this direction.

ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview  

At the top end are some of the chunkiest heatsinks we've ever seen. This board weighs an absolute ton. The Crosshair logo is laser-cut metal embossed onto metal, with the ROG logo there for all your RGB needs. At the bottom of this picture you can see the 2" OLED display. ASUS have brought the LiveDash back for the Crosshair VIII Extreme. Hopefully they've fixed the dogs dinner of a software package that plagued the earlier versions. You can also see the separate DIMM.2 slot that allows you an extra pair of M.2 drives, should the other three slots not prove sufficient for your needs.


ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview

At the lower half the heatspreaders are a tight fit, indicating the care with which the Extreme has been designed. We love how the chipset heatsink is, ahem, mirrored by the mirrored one below it. Plenty of place for your M.2s without needing to take off the whole cover too. We'll get to all the connectors and switches on the next page.


ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview  

Around the back there is the backplate we've come to expect on a ROG product, with a huge cutout for your CPU cooler.


ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview  

The top edge is probably the simplest to cover, so we'll begin there. Naturally being a flagship motherboard the X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme has 8+8 pin CPU 12V inputs, right next to a fan header. You can also catch another glimpse of those chunky heatsinks.


ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview  

Moving around we have two CPU fan headers sitting next to your voltage monitoring points. The Extreme uses horizontal connectors and begins with dedicated headers for radiator fans and water pumps. Nobody is buying this for air cooling after all. Below that the first two of the AURA Sync RGB headers. Let's move further along on the next page.


ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Extreme Preview  

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Most Recent Comments

23-08-2021, 19:58:33

robbiec
I'd been wondering why this had not appeared in the news section
Ticks a lot of boxes for me, 10GbE, 2.5GbE, 5 x M.2, Wi-Fi 6E, BLE 5.2.
Any idea on when these are being released to the wild?Quote

10-09-2021, 17:30:36

Tom Sunday
I do not like short lifespan's! With literally weeks away from all new and much more advanced MB tech introductions, who really cares about old technology like this? Or making buying decisions on any major or more far reaching system changes at this point in time? Before any upgrading, I would want to see all the cards on the table including Intel, before laying out big $$$ for a new MB, which essentially forces me to building a brand new system! Looks like marketing is a little too late and trying to push old gear out of the door!Quote

10-09-2021, 17:47:18

Dicehunter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sunday View Post
I do not like short lifespan's! With literally weeks away from all new and much more advanced MB tech introductions, who really cares about old technology like this? Or making buying decisions on any major or more far reaching system changes at this point in time? Before any upgrading, I would want to see all the cards on the table including Intel, before laying out big $$$ for a new MB, which essentially forces me to building a brand new system! Looks like marketing is a little too late and trying to push old gear out of the door!
From what we know so far, Intels Alderlake will compete with AMD's Ryzen 5000 3D V-Cache equipped line, So it only makes sense that vendors push out more X570 boards with extra features and/or refresh current stock.

As for newer tech like DDR5, It'll take 2-3 years before we see speeds and timings reach a good middle ground, Just like how we did with DDR4, Took a few years before 3000MHz with good timings was pretty normal.

This board won't have a short lifespan as we won't be getting Zen 4 for roughly another year most likely considering all current info points to a late 2022 release.Quote

11-09-2021, 15:00:21

Dawelio
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sunday View Post
I do not like short lifespan's! With literally weeks away from all new and much more advanced MB tech introductions, who really cares about old technology like this? Or making buying decisions on any major or more far reaching system changes at this point in time? Before any upgrading, I would want to see all the cards on the table including Intel, before laying out big $$$ for a new MB, which essentially forces me to building a brand new system! Looks like marketing is a little too late and trying to push old gear out of the door!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicehunter View Post
From what we know so far, Intels Alderlake will compete with AMD's Ryzen 5000 3D V-Cache equipped line, So it only makes sense that vendors push out more X570 boards with extra features and/or refresh current stock.

As for newer tech like DDR5, It'll take 2-3 years before we see speeds and timings reach a good middle ground, Just like how we did with DDR4, Took a few years before 3000MHz with good timings was pretty normal.

This board won't have a short lifespan as we won't be getting Zen 4 for roughly another year most likely considering all current info points to a late 2022 release.
Also let's not forget, that "who really cares about old technology like this?" is pretty much a vast majority of users I'd say.
Most people in this forum are enthusiasts, but there are far more people that aren't.

Just look at Steam's surveys, most doesn't have the highest end components, or the latest for that matter. To those people, this would be an excellent choice.

I know several people that buys the 2nd newest generation when a new one launches, because of several reasons; It's mostly cheaper, that tech has had time to evolve and mature and jumping on the already mentioned, unlike new tech that we all are the beta users for bascially.

There are many reasons why not go for the latest in tech, but rather a bit old. I for one, have become one of those. I have lost interest in building etc and just want to enjoy my PC, hence relaibility is key in my opinion. And then getting the latest might not result in that, probably becuase of updates etc to adress issues that might arise.

I mean, in the end, there's probably several reasons why many people are still on older Intel platforms...Quote

12-09-2021, 09:09:24

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Sunday View Post
I do not like short lifespan's! With literally weeks away from all new and much more advanced MB tech introductions, who really cares about old technology like this? Or making buying decisions on any major or more far reaching system changes at this point in time? Before any upgrading, I would want to see all the cards on the table including Intel, before laying out big $$$ for a new MB, which essentially forces me to building a brand new system! Looks like marketing is a little too late and trying to push old gear out of the door!
Not everyone can afford the latest and greatest.Quote
Reply
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