DirectX 12 Explicit Multi-GPU Performance Review with Ashes of the Singularity

Conclusion

DirectX 12 Explicit Multi-GPU Performance Review with Ashes of the Singularity

Conclusion 

 

Explicit Multi-GPU is something that a few years ago would have gotten a PC enthusiast laughed out of a room, "Nvidia and AMD GPUs working in harmony? Are you having a laugh?". Now with DirectX 12 using two non-matching GPUs in a single system is not only a possibility, but it actually works extraordinarily well, offering fantastic scaling in a setup where we know that there has been no SLI or Crossfire Scaling driver working behind the scenes to deliver great performance. 

In this world where most PC games offer little to no SLI or Crossfire scaling or support DirectX 12 Explicit Multi-GPU in Ashes of the Singularity offers a real breath of fresh air. With Explicit Multi-GPU we do not need to worry about waiting for a post launch SLI or Crossfire game patch or a Driver update, but Explicit Multi-GPU simply works, which is something that almost never happens in any new games, never mind a game in beta. 

With Oxide Games being able to deliver Explicit Multi-GPU in Ashes of the Singularity there is simply no excuse now to see terrible SLI or Crossfire in any future DirectX 12 PC game moving forward, as the support of Explicit Multi-GPU is now down to the developer alone and does not require the Nvidia or AMD driver teams to develop a game specific Crossfire or SLI profile.

If developers take the time to develop their games on DirectX 12 they owe it to themselves and to consumers to implement this feature, as it will be very useful moving forward of we want to see higher fidelity visuals at resolution of 4K or higher and especially if VR takes off in the coming years. 

The elephant in the room is why would you want to use two GPUs that are vastly different from each other, especially when we know that not all games moving forward will support Nvidia/AMD hybrid setups, as we know that we can get GTX 980Ti GPUs or R9 Fury X GPUs to work with an identical GPU in both current and future games with Crossfire and SLI, but if Explicit Multi-GPU catches on it opens up gamers to a lot of new and interesting options. 

If you am currently using a GTX 980 and find an R9 290X at a steal of a price, or have a GTX 780Ti and a GTX 970 lying around explicit Multi-GPU gives you the ability to make a hybrid setup not just work but work really well, giving gamers extra upgrade options, which is never a bad thing. 

With Oxide Games showing that Explicit Multi GPU can be done with amazing results developers around the world need to take note and learn from this, as it is a way to make Multi-GPU support work in your games, with no need to rely on AMD or Nvidia to make a game specific Crossfire or SLI profile.

Explicit multi GPU with DirectX 12 brings a lot of new option to the table for PC gamers, making it a must for those who want to make graphically intensive games in the future and for developers that have a true love for the PC gaming audience like Oxide Clearly has. 

 

This testing was conducted using the Beta II version of the game with the game's benchmark version 2, which will be releases in the Early Access version of the game Tomorrow, February 25th. 

We have also tested this game using DirextX 11 and DirectX 12 on individual GPUs, but this has been left in a separate review, as here we wanted to focus on the Multi-GPU benefits of DirectX 12 and so that we could better present all of our performance data.  

 

You can join the discussion on DirectX 12 Explicit Multi-GPU in Ashes of the Singularity on the OC3D Forums

 

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Most Recent Comments

24-02-2016, 13:18:03

Tripp
Wow didn't think this would be allowed to work, I wonder how long until nvidia stop thisQuote

24-02-2016, 14:00:50

ImprovizoR
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripp View Post
Wow didn't think this would be allowed to work, I wonder how long until nvidia stop this
I don't think they can. It's a Dx12 feature.Quote

24-02-2016, 14:06:36

Tripp
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImprovizoR View Post
I don't think they can. It's a Dx12 feature.
never say neverQuote

24-02-2016, 14:10:07

WYP
The benchmark will go live to the public tomorrow, it would be a big deal if Nvidia removed a feature.

All Nvidia would be doing by disabling the option would be to harm consumers, though they will try to spin it in a positive way for them.

if they remove the feature myself and plenty of other tech writers will flame them for it, as removing a feature is bad for consumers.Quote

24-02-2016, 14:12:23

Tripp
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
The benchmark will go live to the public tomorrow, it would be a big deal if Nvidia removed a feature.

All Nvidia would be doing by disabling the option would be to harm consumers, though they will try to spin it in a positive way for them.

if they remove the feature myself and plenty of other tech writers will flame them for it, as removing a feature is bad for consumers.
they have done it before though right? and Nvidia do genrally get away with a fair share of dodgy sh*tQuote
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