Nvidia GTX1080 Founders Edition Review

What Else Is New?

nVidia GTX 1080 Founder Edition Review

What else is new?

Beyond the obvious elements such as the amount of CUDA Cores and the clock speed, what else does GTX 1080 bring to the party?

GPU Boost 3.0

If you're the type of person who wasn't comfortable overclocking a card that costs a months wages, then the GPU Boost 2.0 technology was a star. It enabled the card to keep overclocking all the while there was thermal headroom so that you ended up with an on-the-fly overclock, yet the moment you were back at your desktop checking Twitter it backed right off to save you power. There was, however, a problem inherent to the way the technology was implemented in that it linearly matched the voltage offset, leaving some un-utilised space between the potential maximum and the actual clock.

The Pascal GPU comes equipped with GPU Boost 3.0 which has negated this minor flaw, allowing you to take full advantage of any headroom available. If you're the type who likes manually tinkering about you can also plot the voltage offset curve yourself to ensure that every last polygon is wrung from the GTX 1080.

nVidia GTX 1080 Founder Edition Review     nVidia GTX 1080 Founder Edition Review  

Fast Sync

We spoke before about how marketing brochures always list the proprietary technologies on a particular model, which are usually interesting for about a month until it's clear that no developer will take advantage of them. Mantle. G-SYNC. 3D. The list of nascent offerings that never evolved into fully-fledged market-defining technologies is long. The latest attempt by nVidia to bring the clarity of a VSYNC image with the high-frame-rates and thus responsiveness demanded by, and available to, e-Sports titles is Fast Sync. It promises all the triple digit FPS you require whilst never tearing, nor demanding specific hardware to take advantage of it. Think of it like Adaptive VSYNC on steroids. With the need of developers to provide their products to the widest possible audience the limitations of the aforementioned technologies were obvious, so it's nice that this is just related to the GPU and not reliant upon whichever monitor you happen to own.

HDR

Just like 3D was a few years ago, the latest display technology that is all the buzzword rage is HDR - High Dynamic Range - which promises a far broader palette than has previously been obtainable. Much like GSYNC this requires you to have a HDR capable display, something which is unlikely to reach a mass audience before we've moved on to Volta. Still, if you're particularly flush with disposable income then it's nice to know you can take full advantage of your latest purchase.

Ansel

Lastly Ansel. Something which might slip under the radar with all the talk about 3D Mark scores or what ever else will dominate discussion, Ansel unleashes your creativity. Have you ever had an awesome gaming moment you captured with a screenshot but wished it didn't have the UI in it, or wasn't limited to your own viewpoint? Ansel is that technology. It's basically a screenshot mode that gives you a free camera. With a multitude of filters, enhancement options, and even CUDA image stitching allowing you to create seriously high resolution images or even ones importable into a VR system or your phones 360° image viewer, it's something that's best explained in images rather than words. 

nVidia GTX 1080 Founder Edition Review

  nVidia GTX 1080 Founder Edition Review 

Impressive, huh?

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Most Recent Comments

21-05-2016, 09:46:21

B0GiE
Nice review and card. I think I will wait for the GTX 1080 Ti though. Quote

21-05-2016, 09:54:21

rickyjb
Quote:
Originally Posted by B0GiE View Post
Nice review and card. I think I will wait for the GTX 1080 Ti though.
think this will be the same for a lot of people.Quote

21-05-2016, 10:01:45

RobM
Tom was this done in a closed case or an open test bench?
never mind I just saw its inside the case but was the side on?Quote

21-05-2016, 10:03:25

MiNo
Rocking a GTX780 this is very tempting indeed.

However, may I ask if it is possible to include OC scores also?

I'm comparing the 1080 scores with the (better) OC 980ti's and there are hardly any difference at all.

Looking at 2560x1440 resolution, the difference in Bioshock is 3 (three!) FPS and in Tomb Raider it is 6 (six!). As the numbers are in the >100 range we are talking a few percentage points difference. Less than 5% improvement.

To me, that means the 1080 'FE' is identical in performance to the best aftermarket version of the 980ti.

Or am I missing something?

PS: I'm *SO* looking forward to see what the chip can do with a bit more power and a bit more cooling!Quote

21-05-2016, 10:28:04

AngryGoldfish
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiNo View Post
Rocking a GTX780 this is very tempting indeed.

However, may I ask if it is possible to include OC scores also?

I'm comparing the 1080 scores with the (better) OC 980ti's and there are hardly any difference at all.

Looking at 2560x1440 resolution, the difference in Bioshock is 3 (three!) FPS and in Tomb Raider it is 6 (six!). As the numbers are in the >100 range we are talking a few percentage points difference. Less than 5% improvement.

To me, that means the 1080 'FE' is identical in performance to the best aftermarket version of the 980ti.

Or am I missing something?

PS: I'm *SO* looking forward to see what the chip can do with a bit more power and a bit more cooling!
I can't remember whether Tom ever mentioned it in his early review, but that 980ti overclocked card he had absolutely denominated any other overclocked 980ti I'd ever seen. Like, I don't know how it was that powerful. It must have been in the top 5% of overclockers, not just reaching really high frequencies but actually scaling in equal measure. Maxwell cards scaled oddly—they didn't always scale equally. One 980ti at 1500/8000Mhz could be vastly different than another 980ti at the same clocks. Some of that was due to the annoying nature of GPU Boost 2.0 and the card throttling, but I found throttling by the normal 13Mhz every now and again did not amount to the kind of variances we are seeing here. Tom's 980ti was ridiculously powerful, far more than any other 980ti I'd seen reviewed. Maybe a Kingpin or HOF on water hit those numbers, but not that I've seen. To emphasis that point, check out Tomb Raider—the ASUS 980 SLI setup is equal to his 980ti OC card. That's ridiculous and no other review I've seen shows anywhere near that kind of performance from a single 980ti. Also, Tom's AMD Fury performance numbers were always behind what others were getting, including myself. This shows how a particular driver and card can vary widely. Something was at play there that caused such vastly different results.Quote
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