AMD’s EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

AMD's EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

AMD’s EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

 
At Hot Chips 2017, AMD revealed some new info about their latest EPYC series of datacenter/enterprise CPUs,  detailing how AMD’s Infinity Fabric tech works in greater detail while also informing attendees of the benefits of AMD’s multi-chip-module (MCM) design. 
 
In AMD’s analysis the found that creating the same 32-core processor with a single “monolithic” die would require a 777mm^2 package, rather than the 4x 213mm^2 (852mm^2 total) packages that AMD actually uses for EPYC. This smaller total die size is achieved by a monolithic design because several aspects of some of EPYC’s 4 dies are redundant in an MCM config. One example is that each of AMD’s EPYC dies has a server controller hub, where only one is needed.   
 
This 10% saving in die space is nothing compared to what AMD saved when moving to EPYC’s MCM design, with AMD’s smaller dies increasing yield and offering the ability to make a wider range of products with these same dies. Remember that Ryzen 3-7 and Ryzen Threadripper all use these same CPU dies, allowing AMD to benefit from both increased yield and higher rates of production.    
 
In total AMD says that their EPYC server chips cost a mere 59% of what a single die equivalent would cost, representing a 41% saving for AMD. This is said to include the additional costs that are incurred to create their MCM product designs.      

  

AMD's EPYC server CPUs offer a 40% cost saving over a single-die equivalent

(AMD Hot Chips 2017 Slide, Via Serve the Home)  

 

This huge saving showcases exactly why MCM product designs are so attractive, allowing AMD to release products which offer huge levels of performance while also coming with highly competitive pricing.

These savings also allows AMD to make decent margins on their EPYC server products, which will be invaluable to increasing AMD’s profitability moving forward and funding further product development. 

 

You can join the discussion on the cost of AMD’s EPYC CPUs on the OC3D Forums.