Intel 28-core CPU spotted on custom ASUS ROG motherboard

Intel 28-core CPU spotted on custom ASUS ROG motherboard

Intel 28-core CPU spotted on custom ASUS ROG motherboard

Earlier today, Intel revealed that they were working on a 28-core desktop CPU, demoing their processor running at 5GHz across all cores. This announcement prompted several questions, some of which many are now answered, thanks to ASUS. 

Below we can see an image from TweakTown which showcases what appears to be a modified server motherboard with ROG branding, offering users a glimpse of Intel’s upcoming Ultra-High-End Desktop offerings. 

Question 1, surely this can’t be LGA 2066? True, Intel’s new processor isn’t using Intel’s LGA 2066 socket, or as it is better-known as, Intel’s X299 platform. To accommodate 28 core, Intel has moved to a new processor socket, a larger socket which appears to have 6-channel memory support.  

Question 2, is this an overclocked Xeon? Maybe, the socket below appears to be LGA 3647, or a similar design, making it seem likely that this is an unlocked version of a future Intel Xeon chip. Intel’s highest-end server chip is their 28-core Xeon Platinum 8180, which offers a base frequency of 2.5GHz and a boost frequency of 3.8GHz. It is possible that Intel’s 5GHz 28 core found its origins in a next-generation version of Intel’s 28-core LGA 3647 Xeon Platinum 8180 processor, albeit one that was heavily overclocked.  

  

Intel 28-core CPU spotted on custom ASUS ROG motherboard

(Image from TweakTown)  

The reasoning behind Intel’s demo was clear; they plan to decimate AMD in the High-end desktop market by releasing processors with more cores that are capable of offering higher single-core clock speeds than AMD, giving the company no opportunity to catch up. 

Intel wants to steal AMD’s thunder before they can release Threadripper 2nd Generation hardware, avoiding a repeat of AMD’s Threadripper launch in mid-2017, where AMD undermined the value of Intel’s X299 HEDT platform. 

None of AMD’s Ryzen 2nd Generation processors has been able to get close to 5GHz outside of sub-zero cooling solutions, making it unlikely that AMD can surpass Intel on the performance front, though Threadripper 2 may still be able to offer customers more value for money. Regardless, the ultra-high-end desktop market hasn’t seen this much competition for years. 

You can join the discussion on Intel’s 28-core processor appearing on a custom ROG motherboard on the OC3D Forums.