AMD reveals their 7nm Vega Instinct MI60 and MI50 graphics cards

AMD reveals their 7nm Vega Instinct MI60 and MI50 graphics cards

AMD reveals their 7nm Vega Instinct MI60 and MI50 graphics cards

AMD has officially revealed their 7nm Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 graphics cards, the world’s first 7nm graphics cards. Both of these GPUs are based on AMD’s Vega architecture, though it is clear that AMD has made some additional changes under the hood to offer increased performance levels in select workloads. 

For starters, AMD has worked to deliver the industry’s highest levels of FP64 compute on a single graphics card, reaching 7.4 TFLOPS on their MI60 graphics card, something that is unmatched within the industry, surpassing even Nvidia’s Turing-based Quadro RTX 8000. On top of that, AMD’s Radeon Instinct MI50 and MI60 graphics cards also offer support for PCIe 4.0, a first for the Datacenter GPU market. 

Thanks to AMD’s use of TSMC’s 7nm process node, the company has been able to condense their Vega GPU design to a die size of 331mm squared, while also adding two additional memory controllers to support four HBM2 dies. This allows the Radeon Instinct 60 to support up to 32GB of HBM2 memory.   

In terms of core clock speeds, 7nm Vega offers a significant boost over AMD’s 14nm design, boosting the graphic’s card’s peak clock speeds from 1500MHz in the MI25 to 1800MHz on the MI60, an increase of 20%. This showcases the performance benefits of TSMC’s 7nm process node, especially after considering the fact that the MI60 has the same 300W TDP as the MI25, while also requiring 8-pin 6-pin power configuration. 

AMD has made it clear that their 7nm Vega graphics cards are not designed for gaming applications, instead, acting as a way for the company to enter the lucrative server/datecenter and machine learning markets. 
 

  Radeon Instinct MI60 Radeon Instinct MI50 Radeon Instinct MI25
Microarchitecture Vega Vega Vega
Lithography 7nm 7nm 14nm
Compute Units 64 60 64
Stream Processors 4096 3840 4096
Peak Engine Clock 1800MHz 1746MHz 1500MHz
Peak FP64 TFLOPS 7.4 TFLOPS 6.7 TFLOPS  
Peak FP32 TFLOPS 14.7TFLOPS 13.4 TFLOPS 12.29 TFLOPS
Peak FP16 TFLOPS 29.5 TFLOPS 26.8 TFLOPS 24.6 TFLOPS
Peak INT8 TFLOPS 58.9TFLOPS 53.6 TFLOPS  
Memory Type HBM2 HBM2 HBM2
Memory Capacity 32GB 16GB 16GB
Memory Interface 4096-bit 4096-bit 2048-bit
Memory Clock Speed 1,000MHz 1,000MHz 945MHz
Memory Bandwidth 1,024 GB/s 1,024 GB/s 484 GB/s
ECC Support Yes (Full Chip) Yes (Full Chip) Yes
TDP 300W 300W 300W
PCIe Support PCIe 4.0 PCIe 4.0 PCIe 3.0
Power 8-pin 6-pin 8-pin 6-pin 8-pin 8-pin

 

When looking at AMD’s 7nm Vega graphics cards, it is clear that the company sees a future in AI compute, though at this time it is unknown whether or not the company plans to bring their AI performance into the gaming market, mirroring Nvidia’s moves with Turing. With the 20% clock speed gains through their use of 7nm technology, I’m excited to see what the company will be able to achieve when they eventually decide to bring 7nm to gamers, especially when combined with a next-generation graphics architecture like Navi.

Sadly AMD’s announcements today didn’t reveal any of AMD’s future graphics card roadmap, or hint at the release of any new Radeon graphics hardware for the consumer market. 

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