Chrome will start preventing websites from auto-playing audio ads in 2018

Chrome will start preventing websites from autoplaying audio ads in 2018

Chrome will start preventing websites from auto-playing audio ads in 2018

 
It has already been revealed that Chrome has plans to introduce their own ad-filtering technology, though until now the release schedule for this technology has not been officially revealed. 
 
In the latest Chrome development blog, it has been revealed that Chrome version 64 will place some restrictions on autoplay advertisements, preventing them from playing sound unless the user indicates interest. This feature is expected to be available on a per-site basis in Chrome 63 (available in October) and get enabled fully in Chome 64, which will release in January 2018. 

  


Starting in Chrome 64, autoplay will be allowed when either the media won’t play sound, or the user has indicated an interest in the media. This will allow autoplay to occur when users want media to play, and respect users’ wishes when they don’t. These changes will also unify desktop and mobile web behavior, making web media development more predictable across platforms and browsers.

Not all users have the same preferences for autoplay media, so Chrome 63 will add a new user option to completely disable audio for individual sites. This site muting option will persist between browsing sessions, allowing users to customize when and where audio will play.

These changes will give users greater control over media playing in their browser, while making it easier for publishers to implement autoplay where it benefits the user. 

 

Chrome will start preventing websites from autoplaying audio ads in 2018  

In time Google wants to create an ad ecosystem that is both pleasing to users and to publishers by utilising their own ad-filtering technology (which will adheres to the standards set by the Coalition for better ads). This technology will be designed to filter away annoying ads and auto-playing audio, offering a more content friendly approach to the “scorched earth” method that is taking by most ad-blockers.

This approach is designed to help the ad-supported internet, which in recent years has been hit hard by the rampant use of ad-blockers on today’s web browsers. 

Below is a list of the kinds of advertisements that are expected to be blocked on both desktop and mobile platforms in the future. 


Desktop

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait before loading the desired page

Mobile

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait
  • Ads that take up more than 30 percent of a screen
  • Flashing animations
  • Full-screen scrollovers

 

You can join the discussion on Google’s plans to silence auto-playing ads on Chrome on the OC3D Forums. 

 

Chrome will start preventing websites from autoplaying audio ads in 2018

Chrome will start preventing websites from auto-playing audio ads in 2018

 
It has already been revealed that Chrome has plans to introduce their own ad-filtering technology, though until now the release schedule for this technology has not been officially revealed. 
 
In the latest Chrome development blog, it has been revealed that Chrome version 64 will place some restrictions on autoplay advertisements, preventing them from playing sound unless the user indicates interest. This feature is expected to be available on a per-site basis in Chrome 63 (available in October) and get enabled fully in Chome 64, which will release in January 2018. 

  


Starting in Chrome 64, autoplay will be allowed when either the media won’t play sound, or the user has indicated an interest in the media. This will allow autoplay to occur when users want media to play, and respect users’ wishes when they don’t. These changes will also unify desktop and mobile web behavior, making web media development more predictable across platforms and browsers.

Not all users have the same preferences for autoplay media, so Chrome 63 will add a new user option to completely disable audio for individual sites. This site muting option will persist between browsing sessions, allowing users to customize when and where audio will play.

These changes will give users greater control over media playing in their browser, while making it easier for publishers to implement autoplay where it benefits the user. 

 

Chrome will start preventing websites from autoplaying audio ads in 2018  

In time Google wants to create an ad ecosystem that is both pleasing to users and to publishers by utilising their own ad-filtering technology (which will adheres to the standards set by the Coalition for better ads). This technology will be designed to filter away annoying ads and auto-playing audio, offering a more content friendly approach to the “scorched earth” method that is taking by most ad-blockers.

This approach is designed to help the ad-supported internet, which in recent years has been hit hard by the rampant use of ad-blockers on today’s web browsers. 

Below is a list of the kinds of advertisements that are expected to be blocked on both desktop and mobile platforms in the future. 


Desktop

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait before loading the desired page

Mobile

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait
  • Ads that take up more than 30 percent of a screen
  • Flashing animations
  • Full-screen scrollovers

 

You can join the discussion on Google’s plans to silence auto-playing ads on Chrome on the OC3D Forums.