Gamers launch a petition to regulate “loot boxes” in video games in the UK

Gamers launch a petition to regulate

Gamers launch a petition to regulate “loot boxes” in video games

 
On the UK Government’s official petitions platform a new request has been submitted for the UK to regulate the countries gambling laws to include the “loot box” systems in many of today’s popular video games. 
 
So far this petition has gained over 5,500 signatures, which is unsurprising given how strongly many gamers feel about “loot box” systems in games, especially in soon to be released titles like Middle Earth: Shadow of War and Star Wars: Battlefront II. 

In the eyes of many, these loot systems are seen as harmful, especially given the fact that many of these games are targeted at children, with the FIFA series’ Ultimate Team mode acting as a huge point of contention given the game’s low age rating of 3.

 
Below is the contents of the petition, which is titled “Adapt gambling laws to include gambling in video games which targets children”. 


Many video game companies in recent years have introduced mechanics which are essentially gambling of which are targeted at children and vulnerable adults. While not currently considers gambling by law they do copy many traits to make them as addictive and can lead to real money being lost/earned.

Gambling in video games mostly involves ‘loot boxes’ where players use virtual currency (often bought with real money) to earn in game items often worth less than what they paid (sometimes more) hence its gambling. 
Currently only china has introduced new laws to force companies to display the odds of winning which had been standard in the uk gambling industry for years.

  

Gamers launch a petition to regulate

 
Regardless of how you view loot boxes, it is clear that most gamers would prefer a direct purchasing model for a lot of the in-game content that is available via loot boxes, like character skins in Overwatch or specific items in other games.    

While the idea of a loot box can seem very exciting, the implementation of the system is fairly exploitative, with some games splitting items into separate parts facilitating the need to purchase a larger number of “loot boxes” or failing to publish the drop rates of specific items in this loot boxes, making it easy for developers to adjust drop rates for items without users knowing. 

 
At this time it is unclear what the solution to the problems associated with in-game loot boxes will be, be it an increase in age rating for games that include them, placing restrictions on developers that are similar to other gambling tools or something else. 

The UK’s Government will respond to petitions that get more than 10,000 signatures, with consideration for a Parliamentary debate coming after a petition reaches over 100,000 signatures. 

This petition is available to sign here, though please note that this petition should only be signed by British Citizens or UK residents. 

  

You can join the discussion on whether or not in-game loot boxes should be considered as a form of gambling on the OC3D Forums. 

 

Gamers launch a petition to regulate

Gamers launch a petition to regulate “loot boxes” in video games

 
On the UK Government’s official petitions platform a new request has been submitted for the UK to regulate the countries gambling laws to include the “loot box” systems in many of today’s popular video games. 
 
So far this petition has gained over 10,000 signatures, which is unsurprising given how strongly many gamers feel about “loot box” systems in games, especially in soon to be released titles like Middle Earth: Shadow of War and Star Wars: Battlefront II. 

In the eyes of many, these loot systems are seen as harmful, especially given the fact that many of these games are targeted at children, with the FIFA series’ Ultimate Team mode acting as a huge point of contention given the game’s low age rating of 3.

 
Below is the contents of the petition, which is titled “Adapt gambling laws to include gambling in video games which targets children”. 


Many video game companies in recent years have introduced mechanics which are essentially gambling of which are targeted at children and vulnerable adults. While not currently considers gambling by law they do copy many traits to make them as addictive and can lead to real money being lost/earned.

Gambling in video games mostly involves ‘loot boxes’ where players use virtual currency (often bought with real money) to earn in game items often worth less than what they paid (sometimes more) hence its gambling. 
Currently only china has introduced new laws to force companies to display the odds of winning which had been standard in the uk gambling industry for years.

  

Gamers launch a petition to regulate

 
Regardless of how you view loot boxes, it is clear that most gamers would prefer a direct purchasing model for a lot of the in-game content that is available via loot boxes, like character skins in Overwatch or specific items in other games.    

While the idea of a loot box can seem very exciting, the implementation of the system is fairly exploitative, with some games splitting items into separate parts facilitating the need to purchase a larger number of “loot boxes” or failing to publish the drop rates of specific items in this loot boxes, making it easy for developers to adjust drop rates for items without users knowing. 

At this time it is unclear what the solution to the problems associated with in-game loot boxes will be, be it an increase in age rating for games that include them, placing restrictions on developers that are similar to other gambling tools or something else. 

The UK’s Government will respond to petitions that get more than 10,000 signatures, with consideration for a Parliamentary debate coming after a petition reaches over 100,000 signatures. 

This petition is available to sign here, though please note that this petition should only be signed by British Citizens or UK residents. 

  

You can join the discussion on whether or not in-game loot boxes should be considered as a form of gambling on the OC3D Forums.