Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018

Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018

Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018

 
We have all experienced annoying ads, full page takeovers that obstruct content, waste time, play unwanted audio and/or video and otherwise annoy users.

This is why ad-blocking is so common, though more considerate members of the online community will know that ads are what pays for the internet, its content and the salary of creators on it, making ad-blocking a huge moral grey area in the modern age. 

Google now plans on tackling this problem head on by developing a new ad-filtering technology that adheres to the standards set by the Coalition for better ads, which is designed to filter away annoying ads and instead of taking a “scorched earth” approach by taking away all ads. This technology is set to be introduced to Chrome in 2018, removing the need for traditional ad-blocking tech while also allowing those with “good ads” to continue receiving ad revenue for their business. 

Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018  

While many will be worrying about the day when Chrome starts automatically blocking ads, there will also be a huge number of content/online creators that welcome the change, as this approach allows frustrating ads to be blocked while still maintaining the ad-supported internet. This will allow creators to continue earning money without the need to resort to subscription fees or moving content behind paywalls. 

Publishers will be able to find out if their ads violate Google’s new standards using their Ad Experience reporting tools. Below is a list of the kinds of advertisements that will be blocked on both desktop and mobile platforms. 


Desktop

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait before loading the desired page

Mobile

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait
  • Ads that take up more than 30 percent of a screen
  • Flashing animations
  • Full-screen scrollovers

 

You can join the discussion on Google’s ad-blocking plans on the OC3D Forums. 

 

Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018

Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018

 
We have all experienced annoying ads, full page takeovers that obstruct content, waste time, play unwanted audio and/or video and otherwise annoy users.

This is why ad-blocking is so common, though more considerate members of the online community will know that ads are what pays for the internet, its content and the salary of creators on it, making ad-blocking a huge moral grey area in the modern age. 

Google now plans on tackling this problem head on by developing a new ad-filtering technology that adheres to the standards set by the Coalition for better ads, which is designed to filter away annoying ads and instead of taking a “scorched earth” approach by taking away all ads. This technology is set to be introduced to Chrome in 2018, removing the need for traditional ad-blocking tech while also allowing those with “good ads” to continue receiving ad revenue for their business. 

Google plans to automatically block annoying ads in Chrome in early 2018  

While many will be worrying about the day when Chrome starts automatically blocking ads, there will also be a huge number of content/online creators that welcome the change, as this approach allows frustrating ads to be blocked while still maintaining the ad-supported internet. This will allow creators to continue earning money without the need to resort to subscription fees or moving content behind paywalls. 

Publishers will be able to find out if their ads violate Google’s new standards using their Ad Experience reporting tools. Below is a list of the kinds of advertisements that will be blocked on both desktop and mobile platforms. 


Desktop

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait before loading the desired page

Mobile

  • Pop-ups
  • Auto-playing ads with sound
  • Large sticky banners
  • Countdowns that force users to wait
  • Ads that take up more than 30 percent of a screen
  • Flashing animations
  • Full-screen scrollovers

 

You can join the discussion on Google’s ad-blocking plans on the OC3D Forums.