Microsoft’s new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

Microsoft's new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

Microsoft’s new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

 

Microsoft has now released their new DirectX HLSL (High Level Shading Language) compiler as an open source project built on the Clang/LLVM framework, allowing developers to analyse the compiler’s source code, modify it or even upgrade it with new features. 

This new development will allow developers to collaborate with Microsoft or hardware vendors to make improvements to the compiler and enable them to use knowledge gained to optimise future DirectX 12 titles better.   

One big upgrade for this new codebase is that it supports a new GPU programming model via wave intrinsics, which will allow developers to take advantage of GPU design features to improve the performance of certain functions like geometry culling, lighting and IO, all of which will enhance GPU performance. 

  

Microsoft's new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

(Knowing how this new shader works will allow developers to optimise titles for PC/Xbox One both faster and more easily)

  

Combine this recent development with Microsoft’s new PIX DirectX 12 performance tuning tool for Windows and we can see that Microsoft is making a huge effort to improve the development ecosystem for both Windows and Xbox One, giving developers the knowledge and tools they need to create more efficient programs and deliver a better gaming experience. 

Hopefully, Microsoft will continue to work and improve the PC gaming ecosystem, as the past year has certainly been transformative for the company, improving UWP with Free-Sync/G-Sync support and fullscreen options as well as creating a dedicated “game mode” for their upcoming Windows 10 Creators update.   

 

You can join the discussion on Microsoft’s new Open Source DirectX 12 HLSL Compiler on the OC3D Forums. 

 

Microsoft's new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

Microsoft’s new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

 

Microsoft has now released their new DirectX HLSL (High Level Shading Language) compiler as an open source project built on the Clang/LLVM framework, allowing developers to analyse the compiler’s source code, modify it or even upgrade it with new features. 

This new development will allow developers to collaborate with Microsoft or hardware vendors to make improvements to the compiler and enable them to use knowledge gained to optimise future DirectX 12 titles better.   

One big upgrade for this new codebase is that it supports a new GPU programming model via wave intrinsics, which will allow developers to take advantage of GPU design features to improve the performance of certain functions like geometry culling, lighting and IO, all of which will enhance GPU performance. 

  

Microsoft's new DirectX Shader Compiler is now Open Source

(Knowing how this new shader works will allow developers to optimise titles for PC/Xbox One both faster and more easily)

  

Combine this recent development with Microsoft’s new PIX DirectX 12 performance tuning tool for Windows and we can see that Microsoft is making a huge effort to improve the development ecosystem for both Windows and Xbox One, giving developers the knowledge and tools they need to create more efficient programs and deliver a better gaming experience. 

Hopefully, Microsoft will continue to work and improve the PC gaming ecosystem, as the past year has certainly been transformative for the company, improving UWP with Free-Sync/G-Sync support and fullscreen options as well as creating a dedicated “game mode” for their upcoming Windows 10 Creators update.   

 

You can join the discussion on Microsoft’s new Open Source DirectX 12 HLSL Compiler on the OC3D Forums.