AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D and 7900X3D Review

Plus 17 Other CPU's Tested with an RTX 4090

AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D and 7900X3D Review

Introduction

Whenever we think about our powerful PCs there is a tendency to adopt the same attitude we did when we were children and begging our parents for a computer. It'll be great for photo editing, or graphic design, or education. The truth is that none of us would have multiple monitors and brutally powerful graphics cards if our systems weren't primarily used for gaming.

Until recently when purchasing a processor you had two choices. You could go for a CPU that was designed for gaming, relatively low core count but super-high clock speeds at an affordable price point, or you could go all-in on a processor that would be best for what are now called Productivity tasks. Namely the things we pretended we'd use them for. Higher core counts equal more heat and thus, as a general rule of thumb, clock speeds were lower to compensate.

In fact processors have been basically the same since the early days of 8086 ones, it's just that core counts have increased, processing speeds have increased, and instruction sets have been developed. Just like the addition of dedicated ray tracing hardware was the first leap forwards in graphics technology for well over a decade, the Ryzen 7 5800X3D was the first big change in the world of CPUs. It utilised 3D V-Cache to massively improve gaming performance with much lower latency and enormous cache sizes. Whilst it didn't really make any difference in regular tests the gaming gains were significant. The problem that specific processor had was that it had all the heat of the beefy Ryzen 9 5950X, just with half the cores, and the gains were quite title specific. It was a proof of concept.

Now AMD have taken their two flagship processors, the Ryzen 9 7900X and Ryzen 9 7950X, and applied that successful 3D V-Cache technology to it, so you no longer have to make a choice between high gaming performance and productivity. Naturally we couldn't wait to find out if applying a great idea to an already great processor would be eye-openingly amazing, and so we've refreshed our test rig with a RTX 4090, tested a bunch of recent processors on a ton of new titles, and we bring those results to you now. Strap in.

Technical Specifications

The main changes between the original 7000 series Ryzen 9 processors and the new X3D models is the inclusion of their 3D V-Cache technology we first saw on the Ryzen 7 5800X3D. Naturally the newest Ryzens are vastly more powerful in terms of core count and clock speed, so we're expecting some spectacular results.

AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D and 7900X3D Review  
AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D and 7900X3D Review  

«Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next»

Most Recent Comments

23-03-2023, 22:16:49

Dicehunter
Would be interesting to see what games like Crysis Remastered and FFXIV do different from a dev point of view that gives Intel such a massive lead in those titles.Quote

24-03-2023, 11:49:08

Peace
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicehunter View Post
Would be interesting to see what games like Crysis Remastered and FFXIV do different from a dev point of view that gives Intel such a massive lead in those titles.
I'd also like to know what happened within Factorio that the 5800X3D is SO far ahead of everything, while also showing that the OLD 79x0C3D performs better.Quote

24-03-2023, 12:36:07

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peace Ð View Post
I'd also like to know what happened within Factorio that the 5800X3D is SO far ahead of everything, while also showing that the OLD 79x0C3D performs better.
The benchmark that we use for Factorio is command line based. Our hypothesis is that the new X3D chips are not detecting it as a game and is therefore running it on the cores without the additional cache (assuming clocks are king).

This would likely mean that the 7800X3D will run this benchmark well, as there is now "V-Cache or no V-Cache" confusion. AMD's drivers are not clever enough to know what workloads prefer using cores with extra cache, they only detect if Windows thinks that something is a game.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.