YouTube toughens rules for monetisation

YouTube toughens rules for monetisation

YouTube toughens rules for monetisation

In their latest community blog, YouTube has confirmed that they are now making it more difficult to monetise videos on the platform, raising the threshold from which creators will be able to monetise their content.   

Back in April, YouTube set the YPP’s (YouTube Partner Program) eligibility requirement at 10,000 views, hoping to prevent “bad actors” from harming the platform. This action was in response to articles from traditional TV and printed news organisations who created stories regarding dangerous content (terrorist videos, inappropriately edited children’s cartoons) earning money on the platform.

With this new announcement, YouTube will be raising these requirements again to 1,000 subscribers and at least 4,000 hours (approx 167 days) of watch time over the past 12 months. Once these conditions are met, channels will be re-evaluated to confirm that they comply with YouTube’s policies. 

YouTube states that these changes will not change anything for YouTube’s biggest earners, with 99% of soon to be demonetised channels earning less than $100 per year.  90% of those affected earn less than $2.50 per year, making an almost meaningless impact on affected YouTube creators. 

YouTube toughens rules for monetisation  

These changes have already taken effect for channels that did not previously meet YouTube’s monetisation requirements, with the changes rolling out to monetised channels on February 20th, giving affected users a 30-day grace period to adjust. 

One problem remains on YouTube, the potential for single, large channels to have a substantial impact on the platform. The company will be holding talks with creators over the coming months to formulate a plan that will hopefully address this problem. These conversations will likely revolve around the recent Logan Paul scandal and how such PR disasters can be averted in the future. 

YouTube’s full Blog post about their partner program is available to read here.   

You can join the discussion on YouTube’s stricter rules regarding monetisation on the OC3D Forums.  

YouTube toughens rules for monetisation

YouTube tightened their rules for monetisation

In their latest community blog, YouTube has confirmed that they are now making it more difficult to monetise videos on the platform, raising the threshold from which creators will be able to monetise their content.   

Back in April, YouTube set the YPP’s (YouTube Partner Program) eligibility requirement at 10,000 views, hoping to prevent “bad actors” from harming the platform. This action was in response to articles from traditional TV and printed news organisations who created stories regarding dangerous content (terrorist videos, inappropriately edited children’s cartoons) earning money on the platform.

With this new announcement, YouTube will be raising these requirements again to 1,000 subscribers and at least 4,000 hours (approx 167 days) of watch time over the past 12 months. Once these conditions are met, channels will be re-evaluated to confirm that they comply with YouTube’s policies. 

YouTube states that these changes will not change anything for YouTube’s biggest earners, with 99% of soon to be demonetised channels earning less than $100 per year.  90% of those affected earn less than $2.50 per year, making an almost meaningless impact on affected YouTube creators. 

YouTube toughens rules for monetisation  

These changes have already taken effect for channels that did not previously meet YouTube’s monetisation requirements, with the changes rolling out to monetised channels on February 20th, giving affected users a 30-day grace period to adjust. 

One problem remains on YouTube, the potential for single, large channels to have a substantial impact on the platform. The company will be holding talks with creators over the coming months to formulate a plan that will hopefully address this problem. These conversations will likely revolve around the recent Logan Paul scandal and how such PR disasters can be averted in the future. 

YouTube’s full Blog post about their partner program is available to read here.   

You can join the discussion on YouTube’s stricter rules regarding monetisation on the OC3D Forums.