AMD Raven Ridge Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G Review

AMD Raven Ridge Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G Review

PCMARK 10

PCMARK 10 benchmarking utility that is designed to deliver users a selection of scores that can be used to judge a system’s performance under specific workloads, ranging from day-to-day office workloads, digital content creation and other productivity tasks. 

In the past, many of these workloads were entirely dependant on your system’s CPU, leaving graphics cards irrelevant outside of specific GPU accelerated workloads.  Today, graphics cards can have a considerable impact on system performance, though not as much as AMD previously expected with their “The Future is Fusion” mantra when creating their previous Bulldozer+Radeon GPU iterations. While colossal gaming GPUs are not necessary for a lot of standard PC workloads, a competent integrated graphics processor is beneficial, especially in low-cost systems. 

We can see below that the Ryzen 5 2400G offers a notable performance boost over the 2200G, with both the APU’s stronger graphics core and SMT enabled Ryzen CPU cores providing it with a 10% performance advantage when looking at the benchmark’s final score. 

These scores cannot be directly compared to our other PCMARK 10 results, as we usually test our systems with a GTX 980 GPU, providing a stable baseline for processors that do not include dedicated graphics. Today we decided to do things a little differently, as Raven Ridge’s integrated graphics are the major selling point of this processor.

You can look at our older PCMARK 10 results here, though it is worth noting that the 2200G sits remarkably close to its last-generation counterpart, the Ryzen 3 1200, despite the fact that it has a GTX 980 for GPU acceleration, with only a performance gap of fewer than 300 points between them. 

AMD Raven Ridge Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G Review